Autoinjectors preferred for intramuscular epinephrine in anaphylaxis and allergic reactions

Ronna L. Campbell, Fernanda Bellolio, Megan S. Motosue, Kharmene L. Sunga, Christine M. Lohse, Maria I. Rudis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Epinephrine is the treatment of choice for anaphylaxis. We surveyed emergency department (ED) healthcare providers regarding two methods of intramuscular (IM) epinephrine administration (autoinjector and manual injection) for the management of anaphylaxis and allergic reactions and identified provider perceptions and preferred method of medication delivery. Methods: This observational study adhered to survey reporting guidelines. It was performed through a Web-based survey completed by healthcare providers at an academic ED. The primary outcomes were assessment of provider perceptions and identification of the preferred IM epinephrine administration method by ED healthcare providers. Results: Of 217 ED healthcare providers invited to participate, 172 (79%) completed the survey. Overall, 82% of respondents preferred the autoinjector method of epinephrine administration. Providers rated the autoinjector method more favorably for time required for training, ease of use, convenience, satisfaction with weight-based dosing, risk of dosing errors, and speed of administration (p<0.001 for all comparisons). However, manual injection use was rated more favorably for risk of provider self-injury and patient cost (p<0.001 for both comparisons). Three participants (2%) reported a finger stick injury from an epinephrine autoinjector. Conclusion: ED healthcare providers preferred the autoinjector method of IM epinephrine administration for the management of anaphylaxis or allergic reactions. Epinephrine autoinjector use may reduce barriers to epinephrine administration for the management of anaphylaxis in the ED.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)775-781
Number of pages7
JournalWestern Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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Anaphylaxis
Epinephrine
Hypersensitivity
Hospital Emergency Service
Health Personnel
Finger Injuries
Injections
Observational Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Guidelines
Weights and Measures
Costs and Cost Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Administration
  • Anaphylaxis
  • Emergency department
  • Epinephrine
  • Epinephrine autoinjectors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Autoinjectors preferred for intramuscular epinephrine in anaphylaxis and allergic reactions. / Campbell, Ronna L.; Bellolio, Fernanda; Motosue, Megan S.; Sunga, Kharmene L.; Lohse, Christine M.; Rudis, Maria I.

In: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 17, No. 6, 01.01.2016, p. 775-781.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Campbell, Ronna L. ; Bellolio, Fernanda ; Motosue, Megan S. ; Sunga, Kharmene L. ; Lohse, Christine M. ; Rudis, Maria I. / Autoinjectors preferred for intramuscular epinephrine in anaphylaxis and allergic reactions. In: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 17, No. 6. pp. 775-781.
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