Atrial fibrillation: are there gender differences?

Hector I Michelena, M. D. Ezekowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The incidence of atrial fibrillation is greater in men than in women, but this gap closes with advancing age. More women with atrial fibrillation have underlying valvular disease, and more men with this condition have underlying coronary artery disease. Atrial fibrillation increases mortality and the incidence of stroke in both sexes. However, women in particular (especially those over 75 years old) may be at increased risk for embolism and long-term mortality. Gender is also an important feature affecting the selection of antiarrhythmic drugs for atrial fibrillation, because women are more likely to develop drug-induced arrhythmias. Stroke prevention with anticoagulation in chronic atrial fibrillation is a priority in both men and women; however, women derive the most benefit from it.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-49
Number of pages6
JournalThe journal of gender-specific medicine : JGSM : the official journal of the Partnership for Women"s Health at Columbia
Volume3
Issue number6
StatePublished - Sep 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Atrial Fibrillation
Stroke
Mortality
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents
Incidence
Embolism
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Coronary Artery Disease
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

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AB - The incidence of atrial fibrillation is greater in men than in women, but this gap closes with advancing age. More women with atrial fibrillation have underlying valvular disease, and more men with this condition have underlying coronary artery disease. Atrial fibrillation increases mortality and the incidence of stroke in both sexes. However, women in particular (especially those over 75 years old) may be at increased risk for embolism and long-term mortality. Gender is also an important feature affecting the selection of antiarrhythmic drugs for atrial fibrillation, because women are more likely to develop drug-induced arrhythmias. Stroke prevention with anticoagulation in chronic atrial fibrillation is a priority in both men and women; however, women derive the most benefit from it.

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