Asthma and risk of non-respiratory tract infection: A population-based case-control study

Duk Won Bang, Hyeon J. Yang, Eell Ryoo, Majdi N. Al-Hasan, Brian Lahr, Larry M. Baddour, Barbara P. Yawn, Young J Juhn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Asthmatics have increased risks of airway-related infections. Little is known about whether this is true for non-airway-related serious infections such as Escherichia coli bloodstream infection (BSI). We assessed whether asthma is associated with a risk of developing community-acquired E coli BSI. Design: The study was designed as a population-based retrospective case-control study. Setting: This population-based study was conducted in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Participants: The study included 259 all eligible community-acquired E coli BSI cases in Olmsted County, MN between 1998 and 2007 and 259 birthday-matched, gender-matched and residency-matched controls. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Only community-acquired E coli BSI cases as the primary outcome was included. Asthma status as an exposure was ascertained by predetermined criteria. An adjusted OR and 95% CI for the association between asthma and risk of community-acquired E coli BSI was calculated using conditional logistic regression. Results: Of 259 eligible cases, 179 (69%) were women and mean age was 61±22 years. Of the 259 cases 37 (14%) and 16 (6%) of 259 controls had a prior history of asthma (adjusted OR 2.74; 95% CI 1.11 to 6.76; p=0.029). The population attributable risk of asthma for community-acquired E coli BSI was 9%. Although not statistically significant, there was a borderline association between having a history of food allergy and increased risk of community-acquired E coli BSI (6% vs 2%; adjusted OR 3.51; 95% CI 0.94 to 13.11; p=0.062). Conclusions: Based on the findings of the current population-based, case-control investigation, a history of asthma may be associated with risk of community-acquired E coli BSI. The impact of asthma on risk of microbial infections may go beyond airways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere003857
JournalBMJ Open
Volume3
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Escherichia coli Infections
Case-Control Studies
Asthma
Infection
Population
Food Hypersensitivity
Internship and Residency
Logistic Models
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Bang, D. W., Yang, H. J., Ryoo, E., Al-Hasan, M. N., Lahr, B., Baddour, L. M., ... Juhn, Y. J. (2013). Asthma and risk of non-respiratory tract infection: A population-based case-control study. BMJ Open, 3(10), [e003857]. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003857

Asthma and risk of non-respiratory tract infection : A population-based case-control study. / Bang, Duk Won; Yang, Hyeon J.; Ryoo, Eell; Al-Hasan, Majdi N.; Lahr, Brian; Baddour, Larry M.; Yawn, Barbara P.; Juhn, Young J.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 3, No. 10, e003857, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bang, DW, Yang, HJ, Ryoo, E, Al-Hasan, MN, Lahr, B, Baddour, LM, Yawn, BP & Juhn, YJ 2013, 'Asthma and risk of non-respiratory tract infection: A population-based case-control study', BMJ Open, vol. 3, no. 10, e003857. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003857
Bang, Duk Won ; Yang, Hyeon J. ; Ryoo, Eell ; Al-Hasan, Majdi N. ; Lahr, Brian ; Baddour, Larry M. ; Yawn, Barbara P. ; Juhn, Young J. / Asthma and risk of non-respiratory tract infection : A population-based case-control study. In: BMJ Open. 2013 ; Vol. 3, No. 10.
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abstract = "Objectives: Asthmatics have increased risks of airway-related infections. Little is known about whether this is true for non-airway-related serious infections such as Escherichia coli bloodstream infection (BSI). We assessed whether asthma is associated with a risk of developing community-acquired E coli BSI. Design: The study was designed as a population-based retrospective case-control study. Setting: This population-based study was conducted in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Participants: The study included 259 all eligible community-acquired E coli BSI cases in Olmsted County, MN between 1998 and 2007 and 259 birthday-matched, gender-matched and residency-matched controls. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Only community-acquired E coli BSI cases as the primary outcome was included. Asthma status as an exposure was ascertained by predetermined criteria. An adjusted OR and 95{\%} CI for the association between asthma and risk of community-acquired E coli BSI was calculated using conditional logistic regression. Results: Of 259 eligible cases, 179 (69{\%}) were women and mean age was 61±22 years. Of the 259 cases 37 (14{\%}) and 16 (6{\%}) of 259 controls had a prior history of asthma (adjusted OR 2.74; 95{\%} CI 1.11 to 6.76; p=0.029). The population attributable risk of asthma for community-acquired E coli BSI was 9{\%}. Although not statistically significant, there was a borderline association between having a history of food allergy and increased risk of community-acquired E coli BSI (6{\%} vs 2{\%}; adjusted OR 3.51; 95{\%} CI 0.94 to 13.11; p=0.062). Conclusions: Based on the findings of the current population-based, case-control investigation, a history of asthma may be associated with risk of community-acquired E coli BSI. The impact of asthma on risk of microbial infections may go beyond airways.",
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