Associations between teaching effectiveness and participant self-reflection in continuing medical education

John T. Ratelle, Sara L. Bonnes, Amy T. Wang, Saswati Mahapatra, Cathy D. Schleck, Jayawant Mandrekar, Karen F. Mauck, Thomas J. Beckman, Christopher M. Wittich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Effective medical educators can engage learners through self-reflection. However, little is known about the relationships between teaching effectiveness and self-reflection in continuing medical education (CME). We aimed to determine associations between presenter teaching effectiveness and participant self-reflection in conference-based CME. This cross-sectional study evaluated presenters and participants at a national CME course. Participants provided CME teaching effectiveness (CMETE) ratings and self-reflection scores for each presentation. Overall CMETE and CME self-reflection scores (five-point Likert scale with one as strongly disagree and five as strongly agree) were averaged for each presentation. Correlations were measured among self-reflection, CMETE, and presentation characteristics. In total, 624 participants returned 430 evaluations (response, 68.9%) for the 38 presentations. Correlation between CMETE and self-reflection was medium (Pearson correlation, 0.3–0.5) or large (0.5–1.0) for most presentations (n = 33, 86.9%). Higher mean (SD) CME reflection scores were associated with clinical cases (3.66 [0.12] vs. 3.48 [0.14]; p = 0.003) and audience response (3.66 [0.12] vs. 3.51 [0.14]; p = 0.005). To our knowledge, this is the first study to show a relationship between teaching effectiveness and participant self-reflection in conference-based CME. Presenters should consider using clinical cases and audience response systems to increase teaching effectiveness and promote self-reflection among CME learners.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalMedical Teacher
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 16 2017

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Continuing Medical Education
reflexivity
Teaching
education
cross-sectional study
Cross-Sectional Studies
rating
educator

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Ratelle, J. T., Bonnes, S. L., Wang, A. T., Mahapatra, S., Schleck, C. D., Mandrekar, J., ... Wittich, C. M. (Accepted/In press). Associations between teaching effectiveness and participant self-reflection in continuing medical education. Medical Teacher, 1-7. https://doi.org/10.1080/0142159X.2017.1301655

Associations between teaching effectiveness and participant self-reflection in continuing medical education. / Ratelle, John T.; Bonnes, Sara L.; Wang, Amy T.; Mahapatra, Saswati; Schleck, Cathy D.; Mandrekar, Jayawant; Mauck, Karen F.; Beckman, Thomas J.; Wittich, Christopher M.

In: Medical Teacher, 16.03.2017, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ratelle, John T. ; Bonnes, Sara L. ; Wang, Amy T. ; Mahapatra, Saswati ; Schleck, Cathy D. ; Mandrekar, Jayawant ; Mauck, Karen F. ; Beckman, Thomas J. ; Wittich, Christopher M. / Associations between teaching effectiveness and participant self-reflection in continuing medical education. In: Medical Teacher. 2017 ; pp. 1-7.
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