Associations between smoking, alcohol consumption, and colorectal cancer, overall and by tumor microsatellite instability status

Jenny N. Poynter, Robert W. Haile, Kimberly D. Siegmund, Peter T. Campbell, Jane C. Figueiredo, Paul John Limburg, Joanne Young, Loic Le Marchand, John D. Potter, Michelle Cotterchio, Graham Casey, John L. Hopper, Mark A. Jenkins, Stephen N Thibodeau, Polly A. Newcomb, John A. Baron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Both smoking and alcohol consumption have been associated with modestly increased risks of colorectal cancer (CRC). Reports have suggested that these associations may differ by tumor molecular subtype, with stronger associations for microsatellite unstable (MSI-H) tumors. Methods: We used a population-based case-unaffected sibling design including 2,248 sibships (2,253 cases; 4,486 siblings) recruited to the Colon Cancer Family Registry to evaluate the association between smoking, alcohol consumption, and CRC. Associations were assessed using conditional logistic regression, treating sibship as the matching factor. Results: Although there were no statistically significant associations between any smoking variable and CRC overall, smoking did confer an increased risk of certain types of CRC. We observed an association between pack-years of smoking and rectal cancer [odds ratio (OR), 1.85; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.23-2.79 for >40 pack-years versus nonsmokers; P trend = 0.03], and there was an increased risk of MSI-H CRC with increasing duration of smoking (OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.09-3.46 for >30 years of smoking versus nonsmokers). Alcohol intake was associated with a modest increase in risk for CRC overall (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.03-1.44 for 12+ drinks per week versus nondrinkers), with more marked increases in risk for MSI-L CRC (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.06-3.24) and rectal cancer (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.08-2.02). Conclusions: We found associations between cigarette smoking and increased risks of rectal cancer and MSI-H CRC. Alcohol intake was associated with increased risks of rectal cancer and MSI-L CRC. These results highlight the importance of considering tumor phenotype in studies of risk factors for CRC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2745-2750
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009

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Microsatellite Instability
Alcohol Drinking
Colorectal Neoplasms
Smoking
Neoplasms
Rectal Neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Alcohols
Microsatellite Repeats
Colonic Neoplasms
Registries
Logistic Models
N-methylsuccinimide
Phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

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Associations between smoking, alcohol consumption, and colorectal cancer, overall and by tumor microsatellite instability status. / Poynter, Jenny N.; Haile, Robert W.; Siegmund, Kimberly D.; Campbell, Peter T.; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Limburg, Paul John; Young, Joanne; Le Marchand, Loic; Potter, John D.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Casey, Graham; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Newcomb, Polly A.; Baron, John A.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 18, No. 10, 10.2009, p. 2745-2750.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Poynter, JN, Haile, RW, Siegmund, KD, Campbell, PT, Figueiredo, JC, Limburg, PJ, Young, J, Le Marchand, L, Potter, JD, Cotterchio, M, Casey, G, Hopper, JL, Jenkins, MA, Thibodeau, SN, Newcomb, PA & Baron, JA 2009, 'Associations between smoking, alcohol consumption, and colorectal cancer, overall and by tumor microsatellite instability status', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 18, no. 10, pp. 2745-2750. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0517
Poynter, Jenny N. ; Haile, Robert W. ; Siegmund, Kimberly D. ; Campbell, Peter T. ; Figueiredo, Jane C. ; Limburg, Paul John ; Young, Joanne ; Le Marchand, Loic ; Potter, John D. ; Cotterchio, Michelle ; Casey, Graham ; Hopper, John L. ; Jenkins, Mark A. ; Thibodeau, Stephen N ; Newcomb, Polly A. ; Baron, John A. / Associations between smoking, alcohol consumption, and colorectal cancer, overall and by tumor microsatellite instability status. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2009 ; Vol. 18, No. 10. pp. 2745-2750.
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abstract = "Introduction: Both smoking and alcohol consumption have been associated with modestly increased risks of colorectal cancer (CRC). Reports have suggested that these associations may differ by tumor molecular subtype, with stronger associations for microsatellite unstable (MSI-H) tumors. Methods: We used a population-based case-unaffected sibling design including 2,248 sibships (2,253 cases; 4,486 siblings) recruited to the Colon Cancer Family Registry to evaluate the association between smoking, alcohol consumption, and CRC. Associations were assessed using conditional logistic regression, treating sibship as the matching factor. Results: Although there were no statistically significant associations between any smoking variable and CRC overall, smoking did confer an increased risk of certain types of CRC. We observed an association between pack-years of smoking and rectal cancer [odds ratio (OR), 1.85; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI), 1.23-2.79 for >40 pack-years versus nonsmokers; P trend = 0.03], and there was an increased risk of MSI-H CRC with increasing duration of smoking (OR, 1.94; 95{\%} CI, 1.09-3.46 for >30 years of smoking versus nonsmokers). Alcohol intake was associated with a modest increase in risk for CRC overall (OR, 1.21; 95{\%} CI, 1.03-1.44 for 12+ drinks per week versus nondrinkers), with more marked increases in risk for MSI-L CRC (OR, 1.85; 95{\%} CI, 1.06-3.24) and rectal cancer (OR, 1.48; 95{\%} CI, 1.08-2.02). Conclusions: We found associations between cigarette smoking and increased risks of rectal cancer and MSI-H CRC. Alcohol intake was associated with increased risks of rectal cancer and MSI-L CRC. These results highlight the importance of considering tumor phenotype in studies of risk factors for CRC.",
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T1 - Associations between smoking, alcohol consumption, and colorectal cancer, overall and by tumor microsatellite instability status

AU - Poynter, Jenny N.

AU - Haile, Robert W.

AU - Siegmund, Kimberly D.

AU - Campbell, Peter T.

AU - Figueiredo, Jane C.

AU - Limburg, Paul John

AU - Young, Joanne

AU - Le Marchand, Loic

AU - Potter, John D.

AU - Cotterchio, Michelle

AU - Casey, Graham

AU - Hopper, John L.

AU - Jenkins, Mark A.

AU - Thibodeau, Stephen N

AU - Newcomb, Polly A.

AU - Baron, John A.

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N2 - Introduction: Both smoking and alcohol consumption have been associated with modestly increased risks of colorectal cancer (CRC). Reports have suggested that these associations may differ by tumor molecular subtype, with stronger associations for microsatellite unstable (MSI-H) tumors. Methods: We used a population-based case-unaffected sibling design including 2,248 sibships (2,253 cases; 4,486 siblings) recruited to the Colon Cancer Family Registry to evaluate the association between smoking, alcohol consumption, and CRC. Associations were assessed using conditional logistic regression, treating sibship as the matching factor. Results: Although there were no statistically significant associations between any smoking variable and CRC overall, smoking did confer an increased risk of certain types of CRC. We observed an association between pack-years of smoking and rectal cancer [odds ratio (OR), 1.85; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.23-2.79 for >40 pack-years versus nonsmokers; P trend = 0.03], and there was an increased risk of MSI-H CRC with increasing duration of smoking (OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.09-3.46 for >30 years of smoking versus nonsmokers). Alcohol intake was associated with a modest increase in risk for CRC overall (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.03-1.44 for 12+ drinks per week versus nondrinkers), with more marked increases in risk for MSI-L CRC (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.06-3.24) and rectal cancer (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.08-2.02). Conclusions: We found associations between cigarette smoking and increased risks of rectal cancer and MSI-H CRC. Alcohol intake was associated with increased risks of rectal cancer and MSI-L CRC. These results highlight the importance of considering tumor phenotype in studies of risk factors for CRC.

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