Association of soluble cell adhesion molecules with ankle-brachial index in a biethnic cohort of predominantly hypertensive individuals

Mahyar Khaleghi, Zeenat Ali, Thomas H. Mosley, Stephen T Turner, Iftikhar Jan Kullo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Higher plasma concentrations of soluble adhesion molecules have been shown to be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events. We investigated the association of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) with ankle-brachial index (ABI), a measure of peripheral arterial disease (PAD), in a biethnic cohort of adults without known coronary heart disease or stroke. METHODS: Participants included 1102 blacks (mean age, 63 years; 74% women) and 1013 non-Hispanic whites (mean age, 58 years; 59% women) belonging to sibships ascertained on the basis of hypertension. We measured plasma concentrations of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 using high-sensitivity immunoassays and ABI using a standard protocol; PAD was defined as ABI <0.9. We used generalized estimating equations to assess whether sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were associated with ABI and PAD, independently of conventional risk factors. RESULTS: After adjustment for conventional risk factors, blacks with sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations in the highest quartiles had lower ABIs than those in the lowest quartiles (mean ABI 1.02 vs 0.98, P = 0.007, vs 1.02 vs 0.99, P = 0.003, respectively). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations in the highest quartiles were each associated with a higher odds ratio of having PAD, compared with the lowest quartiles: odds ratio (95% CI): 5.2 (1.8 -15.2) and 2.2 (1.0-4.8), respectively. In contrast, in non-Hispanic whites, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations were not associated with ABI or PAD. CONCLUSIONS: Higher sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations were independently associated with lower ABI and PAD in blacks, but not in non-Hispanic whites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1788-1795
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Chemistry
Volume54
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008

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Ankle Brachial Index
Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1
Cell Adhesion Molecules
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Odds Ratio
Plasmas
Immunoassay
Regression analysis
Coronary Disease
Logistics
Adhesion
Logistic Models
Stroke
Regression Analysis
Hypertension
Molecules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

Association of soluble cell adhesion molecules with ankle-brachial index in a biethnic cohort of predominantly hypertensive individuals. / Khaleghi, Mahyar; Ali, Zeenat; Mosley, Thomas H.; Turner, Stephen T; Kullo, Iftikhar Jan.

In: Clinical Chemistry, Vol. 54, No. 11, 01.11.2008, p. 1788-1795.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Association of soluble cell adhesion molecules with ankle-brachial index in a biethnic cohort of predominantly hypertensive individuals",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Higher plasma concentrations of soluble adhesion molecules have been shown to be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events. We investigated the association of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) with ankle-brachial index (ABI), a measure of peripheral arterial disease (PAD), in a biethnic cohort of adults without known coronary heart disease or stroke. METHODS: Participants included 1102 blacks (mean age, 63 years; 74{\%} women) and 1013 non-Hispanic whites (mean age, 58 years; 59{\%} women) belonging to sibships ascertained on the basis of hypertension. We measured plasma concentrations of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 using high-sensitivity immunoassays and ABI using a standard protocol; PAD was defined as ABI <0.9. We used generalized estimating equations to assess whether sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were associated with ABI and PAD, independently of conventional risk factors. RESULTS: After adjustment for conventional risk factors, blacks with sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations in the highest quartiles had lower ABIs than those in the lowest quartiles (mean ABI 1.02 vs 0.98, P = 0.007, vs 1.02 vs 0.99, P = 0.003, respectively). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations in the highest quartiles were each associated with a higher odds ratio of having PAD, compared with the lowest quartiles: odds ratio (95{\%} CI): 5.2 (1.8 -15.2) and 2.2 (1.0-4.8), respectively. In contrast, in non-Hispanic whites, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations were not associated with ABI or PAD. CONCLUSIONS: Higher sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations were independently associated with lower ABI and PAD in blacks, but not in non-Hispanic whites.",
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T1 - Association of soluble cell adhesion molecules with ankle-brachial index in a biethnic cohort of predominantly hypertensive individuals

AU - Khaleghi, Mahyar

AU - Ali, Zeenat

AU - Mosley, Thomas H.

AU - Turner, Stephen T

AU - Kullo, Iftikhar Jan

PY - 2008/11/1

Y1 - 2008/11/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Higher plasma concentrations of soluble adhesion molecules have been shown to be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events. We investigated the association of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) with ankle-brachial index (ABI), a measure of peripheral arterial disease (PAD), in a biethnic cohort of adults without known coronary heart disease or stroke. METHODS: Participants included 1102 blacks (mean age, 63 years; 74% women) and 1013 non-Hispanic whites (mean age, 58 years; 59% women) belonging to sibships ascertained on the basis of hypertension. We measured plasma concentrations of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 using high-sensitivity immunoassays and ABI using a standard protocol; PAD was defined as ABI <0.9. We used generalized estimating equations to assess whether sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were associated with ABI and PAD, independently of conventional risk factors. RESULTS: After adjustment for conventional risk factors, blacks with sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations in the highest quartiles had lower ABIs than those in the lowest quartiles (mean ABI 1.02 vs 0.98, P = 0.007, vs 1.02 vs 0.99, P = 0.003, respectively). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations in the highest quartiles were each associated with a higher odds ratio of having PAD, compared with the lowest quartiles: odds ratio (95% CI): 5.2 (1.8 -15.2) and 2.2 (1.0-4.8), respectively. In contrast, in non-Hispanic whites, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations were not associated with ABI or PAD. CONCLUSIONS: Higher sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations were independently associated with lower ABI and PAD in blacks, but not in non-Hispanic whites.

AB - BACKGROUND: Higher plasma concentrations of soluble adhesion molecules have been shown to be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events. We investigated the association of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) with ankle-brachial index (ABI), a measure of peripheral arterial disease (PAD), in a biethnic cohort of adults without known coronary heart disease or stroke. METHODS: Participants included 1102 blacks (mean age, 63 years; 74% women) and 1013 non-Hispanic whites (mean age, 58 years; 59% women) belonging to sibships ascertained on the basis of hypertension. We measured plasma concentrations of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 using high-sensitivity immunoassays and ABI using a standard protocol; PAD was defined as ABI <0.9. We used generalized estimating equations to assess whether sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were associated with ABI and PAD, independently of conventional risk factors. RESULTS: After adjustment for conventional risk factors, blacks with sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations in the highest quartiles had lower ABIs than those in the lowest quartiles (mean ABI 1.02 vs 0.98, P = 0.007, vs 1.02 vs 0.99, P = 0.003, respectively). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations in the highest quartiles were each associated with a higher odds ratio of having PAD, compared with the lowest quartiles: odds ratio (95% CI): 5.2 (1.8 -15.2) and 2.2 (1.0-4.8), respectively. In contrast, in non-Hispanic whites, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations were not associated with ABI or PAD. CONCLUSIONS: Higher sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 concentrations were independently associated with lower ABI and PAD in blacks, but not in non-Hispanic whites.

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