Association of h-index of Editorial Board Members and Impact Factor among Radiology Journals

Solmaz Asnafi, Tina Gunderson, Robert McDonald, David F Kallmes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale and Objectives h-Index has been proposed as a useful bibliometric measure for quantifying research productivity. In this current study, we analyzed h-indices of editorial board members of Radiology journals and tested the hypothesis that editorial board members of Radiology journals with higher impact factors (IF) have higher h-indices. Materials and Methods Sixty-two Radiology journals with IF >1 were included. Editorial board members were identified using the journals’ websites. Editors’ affiliations and research fields of interest were used to distinguish investigators with similar names. Bibliometric indices including number of publications, total citations, citations per publication, and h-index for each editorial board member were obtained using the Web of Science database. Chi-square or Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to test for differences in bibliographic measures or demographics between groups. Results Among the editorial boards of 62 journals, the median [interquartile range] board h-index was 26 [18, 31] and had 36 [17, 56] members. The median journal IF was 2.27 [1.74, 3.31]. We identified a total of 2204 distinct editors; they had a median [interquartile range] h-index of 23 [13, 35], 120 [58, 215] total publications, 1938 [682, 4634] total citations, and an average of 15.7 [9.96, 24.8] citations per publication. The boards of journals with IF above the median had significantly higher h-indices (P = .002), total publications (P = .01), and total and average citations (both any [P = .003, .009] and nonself-citations [P = .001, .002]) than journals below the median. Conclusions Our data indicate that board members of Radiology journals with higher IF have greater h-indices compared to lower IF journals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-123
Number of pages5
JournalAcademic Radiology
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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Journal Impact Factor
Radiology
Publications
Bibliometrics
Nonparametric Statistics
Research
Names
Research Personnel
Demography
Databases

Keywords

  • h-Index
  • impact factor
  • radiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Association of h-index of Editorial Board Members and Impact Factor among Radiology Journals. / Asnafi, Solmaz; Gunderson, Tina; McDonald, Robert; Kallmes, David F.

In: Academic Radiology, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.02.2017, p. 119-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Rationale and Objectives h-Index has been proposed as a useful bibliometric measure for quantifying research productivity. In this current study, we analyzed h-indices of editorial board members of Radiology journals and tested the hypothesis that editorial board members of Radiology journals with higher impact factors (IF) have higher h-indices. Materials and Methods Sixty-two Radiology journals with IF >1 were included. Editorial board members were identified using the journals’ websites. Editors’ affiliations and research fields of interest were used to distinguish investigators with similar names. Bibliometric indices including number of publications, total citations, citations per publication, and h-index for each editorial board member were obtained using the Web of Science database. Chi-square or Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to test for differences in bibliographic measures or demographics between groups. Results Among the editorial boards of 62 journals, the median [interquartile range] board h-index was 26 [18, 31] and had 36 [17, 56] members. The median journal IF was 2.27 [1.74, 3.31]. We identified a total of 2204 distinct editors; they had a median [interquartile range] h-index of 23 [13, 35], 120 [58, 215] total publications, 1938 [682, 4634] total citations, and an average of 15.7 [9.96, 24.8] citations per publication. The boards of journals with IF above the median had significantly higher h-indices (P = .002), total publications (P = .01), and total and average citations (both any [P = .003, .009] and nonself-citations [P = .001, .002]) than journals below the median. Conclusions Our data indicate that board members of Radiology journals with higher IF have greater h-indices compared to lower IF journals.",
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AB - Rationale and Objectives h-Index has been proposed as a useful bibliometric measure for quantifying research productivity. In this current study, we analyzed h-indices of editorial board members of Radiology journals and tested the hypothesis that editorial board members of Radiology journals with higher impact factors (IF) have higher h-indices. Materials and Methods Sixty-two Radiology journals with IF >1 were included. Editorial board members were identified using the journals’ websites. Editors’ affiliations and research fields of interest were used to distinguish investigators with similar names. Bibliometric indices including number of publications, total citations, citations per publication, and h-index for each editorial board member were obtained using the Web of Science database. Chi-square or Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to test for differences in bibliographic measures or demographics between groups. Results Among the editorial boards of 62 journals, the median [interquartile range] board h-index was 26 [18, 31] and had 36 [17, 56] members. The median journal IF was 2.27 [1.74, 3.31]. We identified a total of 2204 distinct editors; they had a median [interquartile range] h-index of 23 [13, 35], 120 [58, 215] total publications, 1938 [682, 4634] total citations, and an average of 15.7 [9.96, 24.8] citations per publication. The boards of journals with IF above the median had significantly higher h-indices (P = .002), total publications (P = .01), and total and average citations (both any [P = .003, .009] and nonself-citations [P = .001, .002]) than journals below the median. Conclusions Our data indicate that board members of Radiology journals with higher IF have greater h-indices compared to lower IF journals.

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