Association of family history of cervical, ovarian, and uterine cancer with histological categories of lung cancer: The Iowa Women's Health Study

Kristin E. Anderson, Christine Woo, Janet E Olson, Thomas A. Sellers, Wei Zheng, Lawrence H. Kushi, Aaron R. Folsom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A family history of cervical, ovarian, or uterine cancer has been shown to be associated with increased lung cancer risk among postmenopausal women. The present report examines the hypotheses that a family history of cervical cancer is positively associated with histological subtypes of lung cancer most strongly associated with smoking and that a family history of ovarian or uterine cancer are positively associated with risk of adenocarcinoma of the lung. Data are from the Iowa Women's Health Study, a prospective cohort study of 34,480 women ages 55-69 in 1986. Personal smoking histories, use of alcohol, and family history of selected cancers in first- and second-degree relatives were collected at baseline. Follow-up for cancer occurrence was achieved through the State Health Registry of Iowa. After baseline exclusions, a total of 343 incident lung cancers were identified in the cohort at risk through 1994. Women with a family history of cervical cancer in a first-degree relative had a multivariate-adjusted relative risk of lung cancer of 1.6 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.98-2.6] compared to women without a family history. The risk was particularly high for malignancies most strongly associated with smoking (squamous, small cell, and large cell tumors; relative risk, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.7). Consistent with our hypotheses, a family history of ovarian cancer was associated with an approximately 2- fold increased risk (multivariate adjusted) of adenocarcinoma of the lung; the association with malignancies more strongly associated with smoking was inverse (relative risk, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.2-2.4). A family history of uterine cancer was not associated with adenocarcinoma, but there was a positive association observed for the most strongly smoking-associated histological types. These results suggest that a family history of cervical cancer is a modest independent risk factor for lung cancers most strongly associated with smoking, and a family history of ovarian cancer is a risk factor for adenocarcinoma of the lung.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-405
Number of pages5
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume6
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Women's Health
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Ovarian Neoplasms
Lung Neoplasms
Smoking
Uterine Neoplasms
Confidence Intervals
Neoplasms
Registries
Adenocarcinoma
Cohort Studies
Epithelial Cells
Alcohols
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Association of family history of cervical, ovarian, and uterine cancer with histological categories of lung cancer : The Iowa Women's Health Study. / Anderson, Kristin E.; Woo, Christine; Olson, Janet E; Sellers, Thomas A.; Zheng, Wei; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Folsom, Aaron R.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 6, No. 6, 1997, p. 401-405.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Anderson, Kristin E. ; Woo, Christine ; Olson, Janet E ; Sellers, Thomas A. ; Zheng, Wei ; Kushi, Lawrence H. ; Folsom, Aaron R. / Association of family history of cervical, ovarian, and uterine cancer with histological categories of lung cancer : The Iowa Women's Health Study. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 1997 ; Vol. 6, No. 6. pp. 401-405.
@article{631591c3f82e434d97cd8e576c2862d8,
title = "Association of family history of cervical, ovarian, and uterine cancer with histological categories of lung cancer: The Iowa Women's Health Study",
abstract = "A family history of cervical, ovarian, or uterine cancer has been shown to be associated with increased lung cancer risk among postmenopausal women. The present report examines the hypotheses that a family history of cervical cancer is positively associated with histological subtypes of lung cancer most strongly associated with smoking and that a family history of ovarian or uterine cancer are positively associated with risk of adenocarcinoma of the lung. Data are from the Iowa Women's Health Study, a prospective cohort study of 34,480 women ages 55-69 in 1986. Personal smoking histories, use of alcohol, and family history of selected cancers in first- and second-degree relatives were collected at baseline. Follow-up for cancer occurrence was achieved through the State Health Registry of Iowa. After baseline exclusions, a total of 343 incident lung cancers were identified in the cohort at risk through 1994. Women with a family history of cervical cancer in a first-degree relative had a multivariate-adjusted relative risk of lung cancer of 1.6 [95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 0.98-2.6] compared to women without a family history. The risk was particularly high for malignancies most strongly associated with smoking (squamous, small cell, and large cell tumors; relative risk, 2.0; 95{\%} CI, 1.1-3.7). Consistent with our hypotheses, a family history of ovarian cancer was associated with an approximately 2- fold increased risk (multivariate adjusted) of adenocarcinoma of the lung; the association with malignancies more strongly associated with smoking was inverse (relative risk, 0.6; 95{\%} CI, 0.2-2.4). A family history of uterine cancer was not associated with adenocarcinoma, but there was a positive association observed for the most strongly smoking-associated histological types. These results suggest that a family history of cervical cancer is a modest independent risk factor for lung cancers most strongly associated with smoking, and a family history of ovarian cancer is a risk factor for adenocarcinoma of the lung.",
author = "Anderson, {Kristin E.} and Christine Woo and Olson, {Janet E} and Sellers, {Thomas A.} and Wei Zheng and Kushi, {Lawrence H.} and Folsom, {Aaron R.}",
year = "1997",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "401--405",
journal = "Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention",
issn = "1055-9965",
publisher = "American Association for Cancer Research Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of family history of cervical, ovarian, and uterine cancer with histological categories of lung cancer

T2 - The Iowa Women's Health Study

AU - Anderson, Kristin E.

AU - Woo, Christine

AU - Olson, Janet E

AU - Sellers, Thomas A.

AU - Zheng, Wei

AU - Kushi, Lawrence H.

AU - Folsom, Aaron R.

PY - 1997

Y1 - 1997

N2 - A family history of cervical, ovarian, or uterine cancer has been shown to be associated with increased lung cancer risk among postmenopausal women. The present report examines the hypotheses that a family history of cervical cancer is positively associated with histological subtypes of lung cancer most strongly associated with smoking and that a family history of ovarian or uterine cancer are positively associated with risk of adenocarcinoma of the lung. Data are from the Iowa Women's Health Study, a prospective cohort study of 34,480 women ages 55-69 in 1986. Personal smoking histories, use of alcohol, and family history of selected cancers in first- and second-degree relatives were collected at baseline. Follow-up for cancer occurrence was achieved through the State Health Registry of Iowa. After baseline exclusions, a total of 343 incident lung cancers were identified in the cohort at risk through 1994. Women with a family history of cervical cancer in a first-degree relative had a multivariate-adjusted relative risk of lung cancer of 1.6 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.98-2.6] compared to women without a family history. The risk was particularly high for malignancies most strongly associated with smoking (squamous, small cell, and large cell tumors; relative risk, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.7). Consistent with our hypotheses, a family history of ovarian cancer was associated with an approximately 2- fold increased risk (multivariate adjusted) of adenocarcinoma of the lung; the association with malignancies more strongly associated with smoking was inverse (relative risk, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.2-2.4). A family history of uterine cancer was not associated with adenocarcinoma, but there was a positive association observed for the most strongly smoking-associated histological types. These results suggest that a family history of cervical cancer is a modest independent risk factor for lung cancers most strongly associated with smoking, and a family history of ovarian cancer is a risk factor for adenocarcinoma of the lung.

AB - A family history of cervical, ovarian, or uterine cancer has been shown to be associated with increased lung cancer risk among postmenopausal women. The present report examines the hypotheses that a family history of cervical cancer is positively associated with histological subtypes of lung cancer most strongly associated with smoking and that a family history of ovarian or uterine cancer are positively associated with risk of adenocarcinoma of the lung. Data are from the Iowa Women's Health Study, a prospective cohort study of 34,480 women ages 55-69 in 1986. Personal smoking histories, use of alcohol, and family history of selected cancers in first- and second-degree relatives were collected at baseline. Follow-up for cancer occurrence was achieved through the State Health Registry of Iowa. After baseline exclusions, a total of 343 incident lung cancers were identified in the cohort at risk through 1994. Women with a family history of cervical cancer in a first-degree relative had a multivariate-adjusted relative risk of lung cancer of 1.6 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.98-2.6] compared to women without a family history. The risk was particularly high for malignancies most strongly associated with smoking (squamous, small cell, and large cell tumors; relative risk, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.7). Consistent with our hypotheses, a family history of ovarian cancer was associated with an approximately 2- fold increased risk (multivariate adjusted) of adenocarcinoma of the lung; the association with malignancies more strongly associated with smoking was inverse (relative risk, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.2-2.4). A family history of uterine cancer was not associated with adenocarcinoma, but there was a positive association observed for the most strongly smoking-associated histological types. These results suggest that a family history of cervical cancer is a modest independent risk factor for lung cancers most strongly associated with smoking, and a family history of ovarian cancer is a risk factor for adenocarcinoma of the lung.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031008454&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031008454&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 9184772

AN - SCOPUS:0031008454

VL - 6

SP - 401

EP - 405

JO - Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

JF - Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

SN - 1055-9965

IS - 6

ER -