Association of cortical and subcortical β-amyloid with standardized measures of depressive and anxiety symptoms in adults without dementia

Janina Krell-Roesch, Jeremy A. Syrjanen, Martin Rakusa, Prashanthi Vemuri, Mary M. Machulda, Walter K. Kremers, Michelle M. Mielke, Val J. Lowe, Clifford R. Jack, David S. Knopman, Gorazd B. Stokin, Ronald C. Petersen, Maria Vassilaki, Yonas E. Geda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to test the hy-pothesis that subcortical β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition was associated with elevated scores on standardized measures of depressive and anxiety symptoms when compared with cortical (Aβ) deposition in persons without dementia. Methods: The authors performed a cross-sectional study, derived from the population-based Mayo Clinic Study of Aging, comprising participants aged ≥70 years (N=1,022; 55% males; 28% apolipoprotein E [APOE] ε4 carriers; without cognitive impairment, N=842; mild cognitive impairment; N=180). To assess Aβ deposition in cortical and subcortical (the amygdala, striatum, and thalamus) regions, participants underwent Pittsburgh Compound B positron emission to-mography (PiB-PET) and completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). The investigators ran linear regression models to examine the association between PiB-PET standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs) in the neocortex and subcortical regions and depressive and anxiety symptoms (BDI-II and BAI total scores). Models were adjusted for age, sex, education level, and APOE ε4 carrier status and stratified by cognitive status (without cognitive impairment, mild cognitive impairment). Results: Cortical PiB-PET SUVRs were associated with depressive symptoms (β=0.57 [SE=0.13], p<0.001) and anxiety symptoms (β=0.34 [SE=0.13], p=0.011). PiB-PET SUVRs in the amygdala were associated only with depressive symptoms (β=0.80 [SE=0.26], p=0.002). PiB-PET SUVRs in the striatum and thalamus were associated with depressive symptoms (striatum: β=0.69 [SE=0.18], p<0.001; thalamus: β=0.61 [SE=0.24], p=0.011) and anxiety symptoms (striatum: β=0.56 [SE=0.18], p=0.002; thalamus: β=0.65 [SE=0.24], p=0.008). In the mild cognitive impairment subsample, Aβ deposition, regardless of neuroanatomic location, was associated with depressive symptoms but not anxiety symptoms. Conclusions: Elevated amyloid deposition in cortical and subcortical brain regions was associated with higher depressive and anxiety symptoms, although these findings did not significantly differ by cortical versus subcortical Aβ de-position. This cross-sectional observation needs to be con-firmed by a longitudinal study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-71
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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