Association of childhood and adolescent anthropometric factors, physical activity, and diet with adult mammographic breast density

T. A. Sellers, Celine M Vachon, V. S. Pankratz, C. A. Janney, Z. Fredericksen, Kathleen R Brandt, Y. Huang, Fergus J Couch, L. H. Kushi, James R Cerhan

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Abstract

Early-life exposures may influence the development of breast cancer. The authors examined the association of childhood and adolescent anthropometric factors, physical activity levels, and diet with adult mammographic breast density, a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Women in the Minnesota Breast Cancer Family Study cohort who had undergone mammograms but had not had breast cancer (n = 1,893) formed the sample. Information on adolescent exposures, including relative height, weight, and physical activity at ages 7, 12, and 18 years and diet at age 12-13 years, was self-reported during two follow-up studies (1990-2003). Mammographic percent density was estimated using a computer-assisted thresholding program. Statistical analyses were performed using linear mixed-effects models with two-sided tests. Positive associations with height at ages 7 (p < 0.001), 12 (p < 0.001), and 18 (p < 0.001) years and percent density were evident overall and within menopausal status categories. The minimum difference in percent density between the tallest and shortest girls was 3 percent, with a maximum of 7 percent. Weight at age 12 years (p = 0.005) and adiposity at age 12 years (p = 0.005) were both inversely associated with adult percent density. Adolescent physical activity and diet were unrelated to percent density. These results suggest that adolescent height, a known risk factor for breast cancer, is also associated with mammographic percent density.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)456-464
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume166
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

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Exercise
Breast Neoplasms
Diet
Weights and Measures
Adiposity
Cohort Studies
Breast Density

Keywords

  • Adiposity
  • Anthropometry
  • Breast
  • Breast neoplasms
  • Diet
  • Exercise
  • Mammography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Association of childhood and adolescent anthropometric factors, physical activity, and diet with adult mammographic breast density. / Sellers, T. A.; Vachon, Celine M; Pankratz, V. S.; Janney, C. A.; Fredericksen, Z.; Brandt, Kathleen R; Huang, Y.; Couch, Fergus J; Kushi, L. H.; Cerhan, James R.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 166, No. 4, 07.2007, p. 456-464.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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