Association of anthropometric measures with the presence and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia

James P. Burke, Thomas Rhodes, Debra J. Jacobson, Michaela E. McGree, Rosebud O. Roberts, Cynthia J. Girman, Michael M. Lieber, Steven J. Jacobsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors investigated the association of anthropometric measures with the presence and progression of components of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and a clinical outcome of BPH in a cohort of healthy, Caucasian men aged 40-79 years that was randomly selected from the Olmsted County, Minnesota, population beginning in 1990. Exclusionary criteria included prostate or bladder surgery, urethral surgery or stricture, or medical or other neurologic conditions that could affect normal urinary function. Height, weight, and waist and hip circumferences were measured. Components of BPH, including American Urological Association Symptom Index scores, peak urinary flow rate, and prostate volume, were assessed on a randomly selected subsample. Acute urinary retention was assessed through review of community medical records. There were few significant associations of anthropometric measures with the presence or progression of components of BPH or clinical outcome of BPH, and there were no instances where the point estimates for the BPH components suggested a dose-response effect. The authors conclude that anthropometric measures are not significantly associated with the presence or progression of BPH as measured by American Urological Association Symptom Index scores, peak urinary flow rate, prostate volume, or acute urinary retention. These data provide no evidence of a consistent significant relation between anthropometric measures and BPH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-46
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of epidemiology
Volume164
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2006

Keywords

  • Anthropometry
  • Prostatic hyperplasia
  • Urinary retention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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    Burke, J. P., Rhodes, T., Jacobson, D. J., McGree, M. E., Roberts, R. O., Girman, C. J., Lieber, M. M., & Jacobsen, S. J. (2006). Association of anthropometric measures with the presence and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia. American journal of epidemiology, 164(1), 41-46. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwj151