Association between vitamin D and pressure ulcers in older ambulatory adults: Results of a matched case-control study

Usha R. Kalava, Stephen S. Cha, Paul Y Takahashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Pressure ulcers are common among older adults, but knowledge about nutritional risk factors is still developing. Vitamin D deficiency is common in the elderly population and is required for normal skin proliferation. The role of vitamin D in pressure ulceration and wound healing is not known. The purpose of this case-control study was to determine the association between vitamin D levels and pressure ulceration in an older community-dwelling cohort. Methods: All cases and controls were community-dwelling elderly older than 60 years in a primary care panel in Olmsted County, MN. Pressure ulcer cases were defined clinically. The controls were age-matched and gender-matched to controls without pressure ulceration. The main exposure variable was 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in both groups. The other exposure variable was the Charlson Comorbidity Index used to measure medical comorbidity. The analysis included univariate and conditional logistic regression for 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Results: The average (standard deviation) age of the study participants with a pressure ulcer was 80.46 years (±8.67), and the average vitamin D level was 30.92 ng/mL (±12.46). In univariate analysis, Vitamin D deficiency (levels, 25 ng/mL) was associated with pressure ulcers (odds ratio: 1.871, P = 0.0154). Comorbidities of the subjects calculated using the Charlson Comorbidity Index were also associated with pressure ulcers (odds ratio: 1.136, P, 0.001). In the final conditional logistical regression model, the association of Vitamin D and pressure ulcers became nonsignificant after adjustment for comorbid illness. Conclusion: Medical comorbidities increased the risk of pressure ulceration. Vitamin D deficiency was not an independent risk factor for pressure ulceration, and may be a marker of comorbid illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-219
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Interventions in Aging
Volume6
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Pressure Ulcer
Vitamin D
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Vitamin D Deficiency
Pressure
Independent Living
Odds Ratio
Wound Healing
Primary Health Care
Logistic Models
Skin
Population

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Case-control study
  • Geriatrics
  • Pressure ulcer
  • Vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Association between vitamin D and pressure ulcers in older ambulatory adults : Results of a matched case-control study. / Kalava, Usha R.; Cha, Stephen S.; Takahashi, Paul Y.

In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, Vol. 6, No. 1, 2011, p. 213-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{152d168b22274e7e933f0fcb0fd84e97,
title = "Association between vitamin D and pressure ulcers in older ambulatory adults: Results of a matched case-control study",
abstract = "Background: Pressure ulcers are common among older adults, but knowledge about nutritional risk factors is still developing. Vitamin D deficiency is common in the elderly population and is required for normal skin proliferation. The role of vitamin D in pressure ulceration and wound healing is not known. The purpose of this case-control study was to determine the association between vitamin D levels and pressure ulceration in an older community-dwelling cohort. Methods: All cases and controls were community-dwelling elderly older than 60 years in a primary care panel in Olmsted County, MN. Pressure ulcer cases were defined clinically. The controls were age-matched and gender-matched to controls without pressure ulceration. The main exposure variable was 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in both groups. The other exposure variable was the Charlson Comorbidity Index used to measure medical comorbidity. The analysis included univariate and conditional logistic regression for 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Results: The average (standard deviation) age of the study participants with a pressure ulcer was 80.46 years (±8.67), and the average vitamin D level was 30.92 ng/mL (±12.46). In univariate analysis, Vitamin D deficiency (levels, 25 ng/mL) was associated with pressure ulcers (odds ratio: 1.871, P = 0.0154). Comorbidities of the subjects calculated using the Charlson Comorbidity Index were also associated with pressure ulcers (odds ratio: 1.136, P, 0.001). In the final conditional logistical regression model, the association of Vitamin D and pressure ulcers became nonsignificant after adjustment for comorbid illness. Conclusion: Medical comorbidities increased the risk of pressure ulceration. Vitamin D deficiency was not an independent risk factor for pressure ulceration, and may be a marker of comorbid illness.",
keywords = "Aging, Case-control study, Geriatrics, Pressure ulcer, Vitamin D",
author = "Kalava, {Usha R.} and Cha, {Stephen S.} and Takahashi, {Paul Y}",
year = "2011",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "213--219",
journal = "Clinical Interventions in Aging",
issn = "1176-9092",
publisher = "Dove Medical Press Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between vitamin D and pressure ulcers in older ambulatory adults

T2 - Results of a matched case-control study

AU - Kalava, Usha R.

AU - Cha, Stephen S.

AU - Takahashi, Paul Y

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Background: Pressure ulcers are common among older adults, but knowledge about nutritional risk factors is still developing. Vitamin D deficiency is common in the elderly population and is required for normal skin proliferation. The role of vitamin D in pressure ulceration and wound healing is not known. The purpose of this case-control study was to determine the association between vitamin D levels and pressure ulceration in an older community-dwelling cohort. Methods: All cases and controls were community-dwelling elderly older than 60 years in a primary care panel in Olmsted County, MN. Pressure ulcer cases were defined clinically. The controls were age-matched and gender-matched to controls without pressure ulceration. The main exposure variable was 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in both groups. The other exposure variable was the Charlson Comorbidity Index used to measure medical comorbidity. The analysis included univariate and conditional logistic regression for 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Results: The average (standard deviation) age of the study participants with a pressure ulcer was 80.46 years (±8.67), and the average vitamin D level was 30.92 ng/mL (±12.46). In univariate analysis, Vitamin D deficiency (levels, 25 ng/mL) was associated with pressure ulcers (odds ratio: 1.871, P = 0.0154). Comorbidities of the subjects calculated using the Charlson Comorbidity Index were also associated with pressure ulcers (odds ratio: 1.136, P, 0.001). In the final conditional logistical regression model, the association of Vitamin D and pressure ulcers became nonsignificant after adjustment for comorbid illness. Conclusion: Medical comorbidities increased the risk of pressure ulceration. Vitamin D deficiency was not an independent risk factor for pressure ulceration, and may be a marker of comorbid illness.

AB - Background: Pressure ulcers are common among older adults, but knowledge about nutritional risk factors is still developing. Vitamin D deficiency is common in the elderly population and is required for normal skin proliferation. The role of vitamin D in pressure ulceration and wound healing is not known. The purpose of this case-control study was to determine the association between vitamin D levels and pressure ulceration in an older community-dwelling cohort. Methods: All cases and controls were community-dwelling elderly older than 60 years in a primary care panel in Olmsted County, MN. Pressure ulcer cases were defined clinically. The controls were age-matched and gender-matched to controls without pressure ulceration. The main exposure variable was 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in both groups. The other exposure variable was the Charlson Comorbidity Index used to measure medical comorbidity. The analysis included univariate and conditional logistic regression for 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Results: The average (standard deviation) age of the study participants with a pressure ulcer was 80.46 years (±8.67), and the average vitamin D level was 30.92 ng/mL (±12.46). In univariate analysis, Vitamin D deficiency (levels, 25 ng/mL) was associated with pressure ulcers (odds ratio: 1.871, P = 0.0154). Comorbidities of the subjects calculated using the Charlson Comorbidity Index were also associated with pressure ulcers (odds ratio: 1.136, P, 0.001). In the final conditional logistical regression model, the association of Vitamin D and pressure ulcers became nonsignificant after adjustment for comorbid illness. Conclusion: Medical comorbidities increased the risk of pressure ulceration. Vitamin D deficiency was not an independent risk factor for pressure ulceration, and may be a marker of comorbid illness.

KW - Aging

KW - Case-control study

KW - Geriatrics

KW - Pressure ulcer

KW - Vitamin D

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80755126939&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80755126939&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 21966215

AN - SCOPUS:80755126939

VL - 6

SP - 213

EP - 219

JO - Clinical Interventions in Aging

JF - Clinical Interventions in Aging

SN - 1176-9092

IS - 1

ER -