Association between eating time interval and frequency with ideal cardiovascular health: Results from a random sample Czech urban population

A. Maugeri, S. Kunzova, J. R. Medina-Inojosa, A. Agodi, M. Barchitta, M. Homolka, N. Kiacova, H. Bauerova, O. Sochor, Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M. Vinciguerra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Aims: The frequency and timing of meals may affect cardiovascular health (CVH) outcomes, but large-scale epidemiological studies are lacking. The aim of this study was to understand the relationship between eating time interval and frequency, and measures of ideal CVH in the Kardiovize Brno cohort study, a random urban sample population in Central Europe. Methods and Results: 1659 members of the Kardiovize Brno 2030 cohort were included in a cross-sectional study (mean age = 46.86 years; 44.6% male). Exposure variables were eating time interval and frequency, and skipping meals. Primary outcomes were indices of CVH, including body mass index, diet, physical activity, smoking, blood pressure, glucose and cholesterol, and the composite CVH score. Cluster analysis and binary logistic regression analysis were used to evaluate eating habits and the association between variables. After adjustment for well-known risk factors, subjects who skipped breakfast or the afternoon snack had a higher risk of poor CVH (OR = 1.613; 95%CI = 1.121–2.320; p = 0.010; OR = 1.409; 95%CI = 1.110–1.788; p = 0.005, respectively). Moreover, we identified three clusters of individuals based on eating habits; from cluster 1 to cluster 3, eating time interval and frequency increased and this was associated with increases in CVH score from 8.70 (SEM = 0.10) in cluster 1, and 9.06 (SEM = 0.08) in cluster 2 to 9.42 (SEM = 0.09) in cluster 3 (p-trend = 0.019). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that skipping breakfast or the afternoon snack are risk factors for poor CVH, while higher eating time interval and frequency may promote ideal CVH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Urban Population
Eating
Health
Snacks
Breakfast
Feeding Behavior
Meals
Cluster Analysis
Blood Glucose
Epidemiologic Studies
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Smoking
Cholesterol
Regression Analysis
Diet
Blood Pressure

Keywords

  • Breakfast
  • Cardiovascular risk factors
  • Eating habits
  • Skipping meals
  • Snack

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Association between eating time interval and frequency with ideal cardiovascular health : Results from a random sample Czech urban population. / Maugeri, A.; Kunzova, S.; Medina-Inojosa, J. R.; Agodi, A.; Barchitta, M.; Homolka, M.; Kiacova, N.; Bauerova, H.; Sochor, O.; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Vinciguerra, M.

In: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maugeri, A. ; Kunzova, S. ; Medina-Inojosa, J. R. ; Agodi, A. ; Barchitta, M. ; Homolka, M. ; Kiacova, N. ; Bauerova, H. ; Sochor, O. ; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco ; Vinciguerra, M. / Association between eating time interval and frequency with ideal cardiovascular health : Results from a random sample Czech urban population. In: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases. 2018.
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abstract = "Background and Aims: The frequency and timing of meals may affect cardiovascular health (CVH) outcomes, but large-scale epidemiological studies are lacking. The aim of this study was to understand the relationship between eating time interval and frequency, and measures of ideal CVH in the Kardiovize Brno cohort study, a random urban sample population in Central Europe. Methods and Results: 1659 members of the Kardiovize Brno 2030 cohort were included in a cross-sectional study (mean age = 46.86 years; 44.6{\%} male). Exposure variables were eating time interval and frequency, and skipping meals. Primary outcomes were indices of CVH, including body mass index, diet, physical activity, smoking, blood pressure, glucose and cholesterol, and the composite CVH score. Cluster analysis and binary logistic regression analysis were used to evaluate eating habits and the association between variables. After adjustment for well-known risk factors, subjects who skipped breakfast or the afternoon snack had a higher risk of poor CVH (OR = 1.613; 95{\%}CI = 1.121–2.320; p = 0.010; OR = 1.409; 95{\%}CI = 1.110–1.788; p = 0.005, respectively). Moreover, we identified three clusters of individuals based on eating habits; from cluster 1 to cluster 3, eating time interval and frequency increased and this was associated with increases in CVH score from 8.70 (SEM = 0.10) in cluster 1, and 9.06 (SEM = 0.08) in cluster 2 to 9.42 (SEM = 0.09) in cluster 3 (p-trend = 0.019). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that skipping breakfast or the afternoon snack are risk factors for poor CVH, while higher eating time interval and frequency may promote ideal CVH.",
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T2 - Results from a random sample Czech urban population

AU - Maugeri, A.

AU - Kunzova, S.

AU - Medina-Inojosa, J. R.

AU - Agodi, A.

AU - Barchitta, M.

AU - Homolka, M.

AU - Kiacova, N.

AU - Bauerova, H.

AU - Sochor, O.

AU - Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco

AU - Vinciguerra, M.

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N2 - Background and Aims: The frequency and timing of meals may affect cardiovascular health (CVH) outcomes, but large-scale epidemiological studies are lacking. The aim of this study was to understand the relationship between eating time interval and frequency, and measures of ideal CVH in the Kardiovize Brno cohort study, a random urban sample population in Central Europe. Methods and Results: 1659 members of the Kardiovize Brno 2030 cohort were included in a cross-sectional study (mean age = 46.86 years; 44.6% male). Exposure variables were eating time interval and frequency, and skipping meals. Primary outcomes were indices of CVH, including body mass index, diet, physical activity, smoking, blood pressure, glucose and cholesterol, and the composite CVH score. Cluster analysis and binary logistic regression analysis were used to evaluate eating habits and the association between variables. After adjustment for well-known risk factors, subjects who skipped breakfast or the afternoon snack had a higher risk of poor CVH (OR = 1.613; 95%CI = 1.121–2.320; p = 0.010; OR = 1.409; 95%CI = 1.110–1.788; p = 0.005, respectively). Moreover, we identified three clusters of individuals based on eating habits; from cluster 1 to cluster 3, eating time interval and frequency increased and this was associated with increases in CVH score from 8.70 (SEM = 0.10) in cluster 1, and 9.06 (SEM = 0.08) in cluster 2 to 9.42 (SEM = 0.09) in cluster 3 (p-trend = 0.019). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that skipping breakfast or the afternoon snack are risk factors for poor CVH, while higher eating time interval and frequency may promote ideal CVH.

AB - Background and Aims: The frequency and timing of meals may affect cardiovascular health (CVH) outcomes, but large-scale epidemiological studies are lacking. The aim of this study was to understand the relationship between eating time interval and frequency, and measures of ideal CVH in the Kardiovize Brno cohort study, a random urban sample population in Central Europe. Methods and Results: 1659 members of the Kardiovize Brno 2030 cohort were included in a cross-sectional study (mean age = 46.86 years; 44.6% male). Exposure variables were eating time interval and frequency, and skipping meals. Primary outcomes were indices of CVH, including body mass index, diet, physical activity, smoking, blood pressure, glucose and cholesterol, and the composite CVH score. Cluster analysis and binary logistic regression analysis were used to evaluate eating habits and the association between variables. After adjustment for well-known risk factors, subjects who skipped breakfast or the afternoon snack had a higher risk of poor CVH (OR = 1.613; 95%CI = 1.121–2.320; p = 0.010; OR = 1.409; 95%CI = 1.110–1.788; p = 0.005, respectively). Moreover, we identified three clusters of individuals based on eating habits; from cluster 1 to cluster 3, eating time interval and frequency increased and this was associated with increases in CVH score from 8.70 (SEM = 0.10) in cluster 1, and 9.06 (SEM = 0.08) in cluster 2 to 9.42 (SEM = 0.09) in cluster 3 (p-trend = 0.019). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that skipping breakfast or the afternoon snack are risk factors for poor CVH, while higher eating time interval and frequency may promote ideal CVH.

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