Association between an individual housing-based socioeconomic index and inconsistent self-reporting of health conditions

A prospective cohort study in the Mayo Clinic Biobank

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Objective Using surveys to collect self-reported information on health and disease is commonly used in clinical practice and epidemiological research. However, the inconsistency of self-reported information collected longitudinally in repeated surveys is not well investigated. We aimed to investigate whether a socioeconomic status based on current housing characteristics, HOUsing-based SocioEconomic Status (HOUSES) index linking current address information to real estate property data, is associated with inconsistent self-reporting. Study setting and participants We performed a prospective cohort study using the Mayo Clinic Biobank (MCB) participants who resided in Olmsted County, Minnesota, USA, at the time of enrolment between 2009 and 2013, and were invited for a 4-year follow-up survey (n=11 717). Primary and secondary outcome measures Using repeated survey data collected at the baseline and 4 years later, the primary outcome was the inconsistency in survey results when reporting prevalent diseases, defined by reporting to have 'ever' been diagnosed with a given disease in the baseline survey but reported 'never' in the follow-up survey. Secondary outcome was the response rate for the 4-year follow-up survey. Results Among the MCB participants invited for the 4-year follow-up survey, 8508/11 717 (73%) responded to the survey. Forty-three per cent had at least one inconsistent self-reported disease. Lower HOUSES was associated with higher inconsistency rates, and the association remained significant after pertinent characteristics such as age and perceived general health (OR=1.46; 95% CI 1.17 to 1.84 for the lowest compared with the highest HOUSES decile). HOUSES was also associated with lower response rate for the follow-up survey (56% vs 77% for the lowest vs the highest HOUSES decile). Conclusion This study demonstrates the importance of using the HOUSES index that reflects current SES when using self-reporting through repeated surveys, as the HOUSES index at baseline survey was inversely associated with inconsistent self-report and the response rate for the follow-up survey.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere020054
JournalBMJ Open
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Social Class
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires
Self Report
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • geriatric medicine
  • public health
  • social medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{b6a5e41d6885476d805f20d6bb56ec2d,
title = "Association between an individual housing-based socioeconomic index and inconsistent self-reporting of health conditions: A prospective cohort study in the Mayo Clinic Biobank",
abstract = "Objective Using surveys to collect self-reported information on health and disease is commonly used in clinical practice and epidemiological research. However, the inconsistency of self-reported information collected longitudinally in repeated surveys is not well investigated. We aimed to investigate whether a socioeconomic status based on current housing characteristics, HOUsing-based SocioEconomic Status (HOUSES) index linking current address information to real estate property data, is associated with inconsistent self-reporting. Study setting and participants We performed a prospective cohort study using the Mayo Clinic Biobank (MCB) participants who resided in Olmsted County, Minnesota, USA, at the time of enrolment between 2009 and 2013, and were invited for a 4-year follow-up survey (n=11 717). Primary and secondary outcome measures Using repeated survey data collected at the baseline and 4 years later, the primary outcome was the inconsistency in survey results when reporting prevalent diseases, defined by reporting to have 'ever' been diagnosed with a given disease in the baseline survey but reported 'never' in the follow-up survey. Secondary outcome was the response rate for the 4-year follow-up survey. Results Among the MCB participants invited for the 4-year follow-up survey, 8508/11 717 (73{\%}) responded to the survey. Forty-three per cent had at least one inconsistent self-reported disease. Lower HOUSES was associated with higher inconsistency rates, and the association remained significant after pertinent characteristics such as age and perceived general health (OR=1.46; 95{\%} CI 1.17 to 1.84 for the lowest compared with the highest HOUSES decile). HOUSES was also associated with lower response rate for the follow-up survey (56{\%} vs 77{\%} for the lowest vs the highest HOUSES decile). Conclusion This study demonstrates the importance of using the HOUSES index that reflects current SES when using self-reporting through repeated surveys, as the HOUSES index at baseline survey was inversely associated with inconsistent self-report and the response rate for the follow-up survey.",
keywords = "geriatric medicine, public health, social medicine",
author = "Euijung Ryu and Olson, {Janet E} and Juhn, {Young J} and Hathcock, {Matthew A.} and Wi, {Chung Il} and Cerhan, {James R} and Yost, {Kathleen J} and Takahashi, {Paul Y}",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020054",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
journal = "BMJ Open",
issn = "2044-6055",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between an individual housing-based socioeconomic index and inconsistent self-reporting of health conditions

T2 - A prospective cohort study in the Mayo Clinic Biobank

AU - Ryu, Euijung

AU - Olson, Janet E

AU - Juhn, Young J

AU - Hathcock, Matthew A.

AU - Wi, Chung Il

AU - Cerhan, James R

AU - Yost, Kathleen J

AU - Takahashi, Paul Y

PY - 2018/5/1

Y1 - 2018/5/1

N2 - Objective Using surveys to collect self-reported information on health and disease is commonly used in clinical practice and epidemiological research. However, the inconsistency of self-reported information collected longitudinally in repeated surveys is not well investigated. We aimed to investigate whether a socioeconomic status based on current housing characteristics, HOUsing-based SocioEconomic Status (HOUSES) index linking current address information to real estate property data, is associated with inconsistent self-reporting. Study setting and participants We performed a prospective cohort study using the Mayo Clinic Biobank (MCB) participants who resided in Olmsted County, Minnesota, USA, at the time of enrolment between 2009 and 2013, and were invited for a 4-year follow-up survey (n=11 717). Primary and secondary outcome measures Using repeated survey data collected at the baseline and 4 years later, the primary outcome was the inconsistency in survey results when reporting prevalent diseases, defined by reporting to have 'ever' been diagnosed with a given disease in the baseline survey but reported 'never' in the follow-up survey. Secondary outcome was the response rate for the 4-year follow-up survey. Results Among the MCB participants invited for the 4-year follow-up survey, 8508/11 717 (73%) responded to the survey. Forty-three per cent had at least one inconsistent self-reported disease. Lower HOUSES was associated with higher inconsistency rates, and the association remained significant after pertinent characteristics such as age and perceived general health (OR=1.46; 95% CI 1.17 to 1.84 for the lowest compared with the highest HOUSES decile). HOUSES was also associated with lower response rate for the follow-up survey (56% vs 77% for the lowest vs the highest HOUSES decile). Conclusion This study demonstrates the importance of using the HOUSES index that reflects current SES when using self-reporting through repeated surveys, as the HOUSES index at baseline survey was inversely associated with inconsistent self-report and the response rate for the follow-up survey.

AB - Objective Using surveys to collect self-reported information on health and disease is commonly used in clinical practice and epidemiological research. However, the inconsistency of self-reported information collected longitudinally in repeated surveys is not well investigated. We aimed to investigate whether a socioeconomic status based on current housing characteristics, HOUsing-based SocioEconomic Status (HOUSES) index linking current address information to real estate property data, is associated with inconsistent self-reporting. Study setting and participants We performed a prospective cohort study using the Mayo Clinic Biobank (MCB) participants who resided in Olmsted County, Minnesota, USA, at the time of enrolment between 2009 and 2013, and were invited for a 4-year follow-up survey (n=11 717). Primary and secondary outcome measures Using repeated survey data collected at the baseline and 4 years later, the primary outcome was the inconsistency in survey results when reporting prevalent diseases, defined by reporting to have 'ever' been diagnosed with a given disease in the baseline survey but reported 'never' in the follow-up survey. Secondary outcome was the response rate for the 4-year follow-up survey. Results Among the MCB participants invited for the 4-year follow-up survey, 8508/11 717 (73%) responded to the survey. Forty-three per cent had at least one inconsistent self-reported disease. Lower HOUSES was associated with higher inconsistency rates, and the association remained significant after pertinent characteristics such as age and perceived general health (OR=1.46; 95% CI 1.17 to 1.84 for the lowest compared with the highest HOUSES decile). HOUSES was also associated with lower response rate for the follow-up survey (56% vs 77% for the lowest vs the highest HOUSES decile). Conclusion This study demonstrates the importance of using the HOUSES index that reflects current SES when using self-reporting through repeated surveys, as the HOUSES index at baseline survey was inversely associated with inconsistent self-report and the response rate for the follow-up survey.

KW - geriatric medicine

KW - public health

KW - social medicine

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U2 - 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020054

DO - 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020054

M3 - Review article

VL - 8

JO - BMJ Open

JF - BMJ Open

SN - 2044-6055

IS - 5

M1 - e020054

ER -