Assessing finger joint biomechanics by applying equal force to flexor tendons in vitro using a novel simultaneous approach

Tai Hua Yang, Szu Ching Lu, Wei Jr Lin, Kristin D Zhao, Chunfeng D Zhao, Kai Nan An, I. Ming Jou, Pei Yuan Lee, Li Chieh Kuo, Fong Chin Su

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) and flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) are critical for finger flexion. Although research has recently focused on these tendons' coactivity, their contributions in different tasks remain unclear. This study created a novel simultaneous approach to investigate the coactivity between the tendons and to clarify their contributions in different tasks. Methods: Ten human cadaveric hands were mounted on our custom frame with the FDS and FDP of the third finger looped through a mechanical pulley connected to a force transducer. Joint range of motion, tendon excursion and loading force were recorded during individual joint motion and free joint movement from rest to maximal flexion. Each flexor tendon's moment arm was then calculated. Results: In individual motions, we found that the FDP contributed more than the FDS in proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint motion, with an overall slope of 1.34 and all FDP-to-FDS excursion (P/S) ratios greater than 1.0 with force increase. However, the FDP contributed less than the FDS in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint motion, with an overall slope of 0.95 and P/S ratios smaller than 1.0 throughout the whole motion except between 1.9% and 13.1% force. In free joint movement, the FDP played a greater role than the FDS, with an overall ratio of 1.37 and all P/S ratios greater than 1.0. Conclusions: The new findings include differences in finger performance and excursion amounts between the FDS and FDP throughout flexion. Such findings may provide the basis for new hand models and treatments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0160301
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

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Joints (anatomy)
Finger Joint
Tendons
tendons
Biomechanical Phenomena
Joints
Fingers
hands
Pulleys
Hand
Metacarpophalangeal Joint
Transducers
Articular Range of Motion
In Vitro Techniques
biomechanics
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Assessing finger joint biomechanics by applying equal force to flexor tendons in vitro using a novel simultaneous approach. / Yang, Tai Hua; Lu, Szu Ching; Lin, Wei Jr; Zhao, Kristin D; Zhao, Chunfeng D; An, Kai Nan; Jou, I. Ming; Lee, Pei Yuan; Kuo, Li Chieh; Su, Fong Chin.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 8, e0160301, 01.08.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, Tai Hua ; Lu, Szu Ching ; Lin, Wei Jr ; Zhao, Kristin D ; Zhao, Chunfeng D ; An, Kai Nan ; Jou, I. Ming ; Lee, Pei Yuan ; Kuo, Li Chieh ; Su, Fong Chin. / Assessing finger joint biomechanics by applying equal force to flexor tendons in vitro using a novel simultaneous approach. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 8.
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abstract = "Background: The flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) and flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) are critical for finger flexion. Although research has recently focused on these tendons' coactivity, their contributions in different tasks remain unclear. This study created a novel simultaneous approach to investigate the coactivity between the tendons and to clarify their contributions in different tasks. Methods: Ten human cadaveric hands were mounted on our custom frame with the FDS and FDP of the third finger looped through a mechanical pulley connected to a force transducer. Joint range of motion, tendon excursion and loading force were recorded during individual joint motion and free joint movement from rest to maximal flexion. Each flexor tendon's moment arm was then calculated. Results: In individual motions, we found that the FDP contributed more than the FDS in proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint motion, with an overall slope of 1.34 and all FDP-to-FDS excursion (P/S) ratios greater than 1.0 with force increase. However, the FDP contributed less than the FDS in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint motion, with an overall slope of 0.95 and P/S ratios smaller than 1.0 throughout the whole motion except between 1.9{\%} and 13.1{\%} force. In free joint movement, the FDP played a greater role than the FDS, with an overall ratio of 1.37 and all P/S ratios greater than 1.0. Conclusions: The new findings include differences in finger performance and excursion amounts between the FDS and FDP throughout flexion. Such findings may provide the basis for new hand models and treatments.",
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AU - An, Kai Nan

AU - Jou, I. Ming

AU - Lee, Pei Yuan

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AB - Background: The flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) and flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) are critical for finger flexion. Although research has recently focused on these tendons' coactivity, their contributions in different tasks remain unclear. This study created a novel simultaneous approach to investigate the coactivity between the tendons and to clarify their contributions in different tasks. Methods: Ten human cadaveric hands were mounted on our custom frame with the FDS and FDP of the third finger looped through a mechanical pulley connected to a force transducer. Joint range of motion, tendon excursion and loading force were recorded during individual joint motion and free joint movement from rest to maximal flexion. Each flexor tendon's moment arm was then calculated. Results: In individual motions, we found that the FDP contributed more than the FDS in proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint motion, with an overall slope of 1.34 and all FDP-to-FDS excursion (P/S) ratios greater than 1.0 with force increase. However, the FDP contributed less than the FDS in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint motion, with an overall slope of 0.95 and P/S ratios smaller than 1.0 throughout the whole motion except between 1.9% and 13.1% force. In free joint movement, the FDP played a greater role than the FDS, with an overall ratio of 1.37 and all P/S ratios greater than 1.0. Conclusions: The new findings include differences in finger performance and excursion amounts between the FDS and FDP throughout flexion. Such findings may provide the basis for new hand models and treatments.

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