Aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and pancreatic cancer risk

A clinic-based case-control study

Xiang Lin Tan, Kaye M. Reid Lombardo, William R. Bamlet, Ann L Oberg, Dennis P. Robinson, Kristin E. Anderson, Gloria M Petersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) show indisputable promise as cancer chemoprevention agents. However, studies have been inconsistent as to whether aspirin has a protective effect in development of pancreatic cancer. To further evaluate the association between aspirin, NSAID, and acetaminophen use with pancreatic cancer risk, we used a clinic-based case-control study of 904 rapidly ascertained histologically or clinically documented pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases, and 1,224 age- and sex-matched healthy controls evaluated at Mayo Clinic from April 2004 to September 2010. Overall, there is no relationship between non-aspirin NSAID or acetaminophen use and risk of pancreatic cancer. Aspirin use for 1 d/mo or greater was associated with a significantly decreased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.60-0.91, P = 0.005) compared with never or less than 1 d/mo. Analysis by frequency and frequency-dosage of use categories showed reduced risk (P = 0.007 and 0.022, respectively). This inverse association was also found for those who took low-dose aspirin for heart disease prevention (OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.49-0.92, P = 0.013). In subgroup analyses, the association between aspirin use and pancreatic cancer was not significantly affected by pancreatic cancer stage, smoking status, or body mass index. Our data suggest that aspirin use, but not non-aspirin NSAID use, is associated with lowered risk of developing pancreatic cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1835-1841
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Prevention Research
Volume4
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

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Acetaminophen
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Aspirin
Case-Control Studies
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Chemoprevention
Heart Diseases
Adenocarcinoma
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and pancreatic cancer risk : A clinic-based case-control study. / Tan, Xiang Lin; Reid Lombardo, Kaye M.; Bamlet, William R.; Oberg, Ann L; Robinson, Dennis P.; Anderson, Kristin E.; Petersen, Gloria M.

In: Cancer Prevention Research, Vol. 4, No. 11, 11.2011, p. 1835-1841.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tan, Xiang Lin ; Reid Lombardo, Kaye M. ; Bamlet, William R. ; Oberg, Ann L ; Robinson, Dennis P. ; Anderson, Kristin E. ; Petersen, Gloria M. / Aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and pancreatic cancer risk : A clinic-based case-control study. In: Cancer Prevention Research. 2011 ; Vol. 4, No. 11. pp. 1835-1841.
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abstract = "Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) show indisputable promise as cancer chemoprevention agents. However, studies have been inconsistent as to whether aspirin has a protective effect in development of pancreatic cancer. To further evaluate the association between aspirin, NSAID, and acetaminophen use with pancreatic cancer risk, we used a clinic-based case-control study of 904 rapidly ascertained histologically or clinically documented pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases, and 1,224 age- and sex-matched healthy controls evaluated at Mayo Clinic from April 2004 to September 2010. Overall, there is no relationship between non-aspirin NSAID or acetaminophen use and risk of pancreatic cancer. Aspirin use for 1 d/mo or greater was associated with a significantly decreased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR = 0.74, 95{\%} CI: 0.60-0.91, P = 0.005) compared with never or less than 1 d/mo. Analysis by frequency and frequency-dosage of use categories showed reduced risk (P = 0.007 and 0.022, respectively). This inverse association was also found for those who took low-dose aspirin for heart disease prevention (OR = 0.67, 95{\%} CI: 0.49-0.92, P = 0.013). In subgroup analyses, the association between aspirin use and pancreatic cancer was not significantly affected by pancreatic cancer stage, smoking status, or body mass index. Our data suggest that aspirin use, but not non-aspirin NSAID use, is associated with lowered risk of developing pancreatic cancer.",
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