Aspirin, nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and acetaminophen use and risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer: A pooled analysis in the ovarian cancer association consortium

Britton Trabert, Roberta B. Ness, Wei Hsuan Lo-Ciganic, Megan A. Murphy, Ellen L. Goode, Elizabeth M. Poole, Louise A. Brinton, Penelope M. Webb, Christina M. Nagle, Susan J. Jordan, Harvey A. Risch, Mary Anne Rossing, Jennifer A. Doherty, Marc T. Goodman, Galina Lurie, Susanne K. Kjær, Estrid Hogdall, Allan Jensen, Daniel W. Cramer, Kathryn L. TerryAllison Vitonis, Elisa V. Bandera, Sara Olson, Melony G. King, Urmila Chandran, Hoda Anton-Culver, Argyrios Ziogas, Usha Menon, Simon A. Gayther, Susan J. Ramus, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Anna H. Wu, Celeste Leigh Pearce, Malcolm C. Pike, Andrew Berchuck, Joellen M. Schildkraut, Nicolas Wentzensen

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135 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Regular aspirin use is associated with reduced risk of several malignancies. Epidemiologic studies analyzing aspirin, nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and acetaminophen use and ovarian cancer risk have been inconclusive. Methods: We analyzed pooled data from 12 population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer, including 7776 case patients and 11 843 control subjects accrued between 1992 and 2007. Odds ratios (ORs) for associations of medication use with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were estimated in individual studies using logistic regression and combined using random effects meta-analysis. Associations between frequency, dose, and duration of analgesic use and risk of ovarian cancer were also assessed. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Aspirin use was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer (OR = 0.91; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.84 to 0.99). Results were similar but not statistically significant for nonaspirin NSAIDs, and there was no association with acetaminophen. In seven studies with frequency data, the reduced risk was strongest among daily aspirin users (OR = 0.80; 95% CI = 0.67 to 0.96). In three studies with dose information, the reduced risk was strongest among users of low dose (<100 mg) aspirin (OR = 0.66; 95% CI = 0.53 to 0.83), whereas for nonaspirin NSAIDs, the reduced risk was strongest for high dose (≥500 mg) usage (OR = 0.76; 95% CI = 0.64 to 0.91). Conclusions: Aspirin use was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer, especially among daily users of low-dose aspirin. These findings suggest that the same aspirin regimen proven to protect against cardiovascular events and several cancers could reduce the risk of ovarian cancer 20% to 34% depending on frequency and dose of use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume106
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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