Aprotinin and deep hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with or without circulatory arrest for craniotomy

Robert E. Grady, William C. Oliver, Martin D. Abel, Fredric B. Meyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Deep hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with or without circulatory arrest has been used to facilitate the surgical repair of complex cerebrovascular lesions. The advantages of deep hypothermia have been tempered by the occurrence of coagulopathy that is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. This study analyzed retrospectively the records of 13 patients who underwent cerebrovascular neurosurgery using deep hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with or without circulatory arrest during the period 1993 through 1999. All patients received the serine protease inhibitor aprotinin in an effort to avoid the development of a coagulopathy, defined as hemorrhage requiring reoperation. No patients developed postoperative intracranial hemorrhage. There was also no evidence of renal dysfunction, deep venous thrombosis, myocardial infarction, or pulmonary embolism. In conclusion, this study suggests that aprotinin may be beneficial to avoid the coagulopathy that is more likely to occur if deep hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with or without circulatory arrest is used for craniotomy without adverse effects on renal function or apparent thrombotic complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-140
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 11 2002

Keywords

  • Aprotinin
  • Cerebral aneurysm
  • Circulatory arrest
  • Craniotomy
  • Hemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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