APPLICATION OF STOCHASTIC ANALYSIS TO ULTRASONIC ECHOES-ESTIMATION OF ATTENUATION AND TISSUE HETEROGENEITY FROM PEAKS OF ECHO ENVELOPE.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A study of the statistics of ultrasound speckle indicates that the noise-to-signal ratio (NSR) of the echo envelope peaks (EEP) in a B scan is monotonically related to the variance of the mean power of the backscattered echoes. If it is assumed that the backscattered echoes all have the same mean power, the NSR of the EEP's in a B scan will be expected to reach a theoretical minimum value NSR//0 (0. 40approx. 0. 42). In practical situations, the variance of the mean power of the echoes is increased due to the presence of both attenuation (including beam spreading) and the spatial variation in the backscattering cross section (BCS) of the tissue. Accordingly, the measured value of the NSR of the EEP's is expected to be greater than the NSR//0. In principle, the effects of beam pattern and the attenuation can be compensated for by system calibration and a depth-related gain function, respectively. The attenuation coefficient of the tissue may then be obtained by adjusting the gain function to minimize the NSR of the EEP's. Due to the random nature of the heterogeneity of diseased tissue, the effect of the variation in the BCS, however, cannot be compensated for by the depth-related gain function. Therefore, the minimum value of the NSR indicates the spatial variation in the BCS and may finally correlate to the disease state of the tissue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)526-534
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume79
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1986

Fingerprint

echoes
signal to noise ratios
envelopes
ultrasonics
attenuation
backscattering
cross sections
attenuation coefficients
Attenuation
Signal-to-noise Ratio
adjusting
statistics
Cross Section

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

@article{ecee3a04665a4ba098d387c1a9d93625,
title = "APPLICATION OF STOCHASTIC ANALYSIS TO ULTRASONIC ECHOES-ESTIMATION OF ATTENUATION AND TISSUE HETEROGENEITY FROM PEAKS OF ECHO ENVELOPE.",
abstract = "A study of the statistics of ultrasound speckle indicates that the noise-to-signal ratio (NSR) of the echo envelope peaks (EEP) in a B scan is monotonically related to the variance of the mean power of the backscattered echoes. If it is assumed that the backscattered echoes all have the same mean power, the NSR of the EEP's in a B scan will be expected to reach a theoretical minimum value NSR//0 (0. 40approx. 0. 42). In practical situations, the variance of the mean power of the echoes is increased due to the presence of both attenuation (including beam spreading) and the spatial variation in the backscattering cross section (BCS) of the tissue. Accordingly, the measured value of the NSR of the EEP's is expected to be greater than the NSR//0. In principle, the effects of beam pattern and the attenuation can be compensated for by system calibration and a depth-related gain function, respectively. The attenuation coefficient of the tissue may then be obtained by adjusting the gain function to minimize the NSR of the EEP's. Due to the random nature of the heterogeneity of diseased tissue, the effect of the variation in the BCS, however, cannot be compensated for by the depth-related gain function. Therefore, the minimum value of the NSR indicates the spatial variation in the BCS and may finally correlate to the disease state of the tissue.",
author = "Ping He and Greenleaf, {James F}",
year = "1986",
month = "2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "79",
pages = "526--534",
journal = "Journal of the Acoustical Society of America",
issn = "0001-4966",
publisher = "Acoustical Society of America",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - APPLICATION OF STOCHASTIC ANALYSIS TO ULTRASONIC ECHOES-ESTIMATION OF ATTENUATION AND TISSUE HETEROGENEITY FROM PEAKS OF ECHO ENVELOPE.

AU - He, Ping

AU - Greenleaf, James F

PY - 1986/2

Y1 - 1986/2

N2 - A study of the statistics of ultrasound speckle indicates that the noise-to-signal ratio (NSR) of the echo envelope peaks (EEP) in a B scan is monotonically related to the variance of the mean power of the backscattered echoes. If it is assumed that the backscattered echoes all have the same mean power, the NSR of the EEP's in a B scan will be expected to reach a theoretical minimum value NSR//0 (0. 40approx. 0. 42). In practical situations, the variance of the mean power of the echoes is increased due to the presence of both attenuation (including beam spreading) and the spatial variation in the backscattering cross section (BCS) of the tissue. Accordingly, the measured value of the NSR of the EEP's is expected to be greater than the NSR//0. In principle, the effects of beam pattern and the attenuation can be compensated for by system calibration and a depth-related gain function, respectively. The attenuation coefficient of the tissue may then be obtained by adjusting the gain function to minimize the NSR of the EEP's. Due to the random nature of the heterogeneity of diseased tissue, the effect of the variation in the BCS, however, cannot be compensated for by the depth-related gain function. Therefore, the minimum value of the NSR indicates the spatial variation in the BCS and may finally correlate to the disease state of the tissue.

AB - A study of the statistics of ultrasound speckle indicates that the noise-to-signal ratio (NSR) of the echo envelope peaks (EEP) in a B scan is monotonically related to the variance of the mean power of the backscattered echoes. If it is assumed that the backscattered echoes all have the same mean power, the NSR of the EEP's in a B scan will be expected to reach a theoretical minimum value NSR//0 (0. 40approx. 0. 42). In practical situations, the variance of the mean power of the echoes is increased due to the presence of both attenuation (including beam spreading) and the spatial variation in the backscattering cross section (BCS) of the tissue. Accordingly, the measured value of the NSR of the EEP's is expected to be greater than the NSR//0. In principle, the effects of beam pattern and the attenuation can be compensated for by system calibration and a depth-related gain function, respectively. The attenuation coefficient of the tissue may then be obtained by adjusting the gain function to minimize the NSR of the EEP's. Due to the random nature of the heterogeneity of diseased tissue, the effect of the variation in the BCS, however, cannot be compensated for by the depth-related gain function. Therefore, the minimum value of the NSR indicates the spatial variation in the BCS and may finally correlate to the disease state of the tissue.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022664580&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0022664580&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 3512650

AN - SCOPUS:0022664580

VL - 79

SP - 526

EP - 534

JO - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

JF - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

SN - 0001-4966

IS - 2

ER -