Application of sociometer badges in simulated health environments: Can wearable devices quantify individual's workload?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Workload experienced by health care workers continues to be a challenge to define and quantify. The purpose of the current study is to present descriptive data on the application of sociometers in an emergency care environment during simulated hand-off scenarios and discuss their potential and limitations for quantifying individual's workload in health care settings. Sociometer devices, worn by nine actors, collected body movement, interactions, and speech data during four simulated hand-off scenarios in the emergency department wards. Results found that sociometers distinguished body movement differences between sitting, standing, lying, and walking individuals. Interactions quantified by the devices were limited by obstructions, distance, and angles between the sociometer devices. The data collected by these devices show promise in providing human factors researchers a tool for quantifying the dynamic exposures experienced by health care workers over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages538-542
Number of pages5
Volume2015-January
ISBN (Electronic)9780945289470
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Event59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014 - Los Angeles, United States
Duration: Oct 26 2015Oct 30 2015

Other

Other59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles
Period10/26/1510/30/15

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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    Yu, D., Blocker, R., Hallbeck, S., Sir, M., Hellmich, T., & Pasupathy, K. S. (2015). Application of sociometer badges in simulated health environments: Can wearable devices quantify individual's workload? In 2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015 (Vol. 2015-January, pp. 538-542). Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931215591117