Apolipoprotein e and its receptors in Alzheimer's disease: Pathways, pathogenesis and therapy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The vast majority of Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases are late-onset and their development is probably influenced by both genetic and environmental risk factors. A strong genetic risk factor for late-onset AD is the presence of the 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene, which encodes a protein with crucial roles in cholesterol metabolism. There is mounting evidence that APOE4 contributes to AD pathogenesis by modulating the metabolism and aggregation of amyloid-Β peptide and by directly regulating brain lipid metabolism and synaptic functions through APOE receptors. Emerging knowledge of the contribution of APOE to the pathophysiology of AD presents new opportunities for AD therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-344
Number of pages12
JournalNature Reviews Neuroscience
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Apolipoproteins
Alzheimer Disease
Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-1
Apolipoprotein E4
Therapeutics
Apolipoproteins E
Lipid Metabolism
Amyloid
Alleles
Cholesterol
Peptides
Brain
Genes
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Apolipoprotein e and its receptors in Alzheimer's disease : Pathways, pathogenesis and therapy. / Bu, Guojun D.

In: Nature Reviews Neuroscience, Vol. 10, No. 5, 05.2009, p. 333-344.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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