Antihypertensive efficacy of lisinopril ambulatory blood pressure monitoring

Prince K. Zachariah, Sheldon G. Sheps, Gary L. Schwartz, Alexander Schirger, Duane M. Ilstrup, Cynthia R. Long, Christopher A. Carlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Noninvasive automatic ambulatory blood pressure monitoring during 24 hours in eight patients with moderate hypertension was used to determine the blood pressure response to lisinopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. Office, 24-hour ambulatory, awake ambulatory, and sleep ambulatory diastolic blood pressures were decreased from 108 ± 3, 98 ± 8, 101 ± 7, and 87 ± 24 mm Hg, respectively, at baseline to 83 ±4 (P < 0.0001), 82 ±7 (P < 0.0001), 84 ±7 (P < 0.0001), and 73 ±9 mm Hg (P < 0.005), respectively, after 20 weeks of lisinopril treatment (dose range, 40 to 80 mg once daily). The diastolic blood pressure loads (percentages of ambulatory diastolic blood pressures more than 90 mm Hg) during 24 hours and during awake hours were 74% ± 29% and 83% ± 25%, respectively, at baseline and 24% ± 19% (P < 0.0001) and 29% ± 22% (P < 0.0001), respectively, during treatment. Heart rate was not altered by lisinopril. In conclusion, lisinopril is an effective antihypertensive agent for the treatment of moderate hypertension, and ambulatory blood pressures and diastolic blood pressure loads are useful for evaluating therapy for hypertension. Am J Hypertens 1988; 1:274S-279S.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)274S-279S
JournalAmerican journal of hypertension
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1988

Keywords

  • Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring
  • Antihypertensive agent
  • Lisinopril

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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