Anti-HIV agent trichosanthin enhances the capabilities of chemokines to stimulate chemotaxis and G protein activation, and this is mediated through interaction of trichosanthin and chemokine receptors

Jian Zhao, Li Hong Ben, Ya Lan Wu, Wei Hu, Kun Ling, Shun Mei Xin, Hui Ling Nie, Lan Ma, Gang Pei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Scopus citations

Abstract

Trichosanthin (TCS), an active protein component isolated from a traditional Chinese medicinal herb Trichosanthes kirilowii, has been shown to inhibit HIV infection and has been applied in clinical treatment of AIDS. The recent development that chemokines and chemokine receptors play important roles in HIV infection led us to investigate the possible functional interaction of TCS with chemokines and their receptors. This study demonstrated that TCS greatly enhanced both RANTES (regulated upon activation, normat T cell expressed and secreted)- and stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α-stimulated chemotaxis (EC50 ≃ 1 nM) in leukocytes (THP- 1, jurkat, and peripheral blood lymphocyte cells) and activation of pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein (EC50 ≃ 20 nM). TCS also significantly augmented chemokine-stimulated activation of chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 as well as CCR1, CCR2B, CCR3, and CCR4 transiently expressed in HEK293 cells. A mutant TCS with 4,000 fold lower ribosome-inactivating activity showed similar augmentation activity as wild-type TCS. Moreover, flow cytometry demonstrated that the specific association of TCS to the cell membranes required the presence of chemokine receptors, and laser confocal microscopy reveals that TCS was colocalized with chemokine receptors on the membranes. The results from TCS-Sepharose pull-down and TCS and chemokine receptor coimmunoprecipitation and cross-linking experiments demonstrated associated of TCS with CCR5. Thus, our data clearly demonstrated that TCS synergizes activities of chemokines to stimulate chemotaxis and G protein activation, and the effects of TCS are likely to be mediated through its interaction with chemokine receptors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-111
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Experimental Medicine
Volume190
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 5 1999

Keywords

  • Chemokine receptors
  • Chemotaxis
  • G proteins
  • HIV
  • Trichosanthin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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