Anterior cruciate ligament grafts display differential maturation patterns on magnetic resonance imaging following reconstruction: a systematic review

Joseph A. Panos, Kate E. Webster, Timothy E. Hewett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The appearance of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) grafts on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is related to graft maturity and mechanical strength after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Accordingly, the purpose of this review was to quantitatively analyze reports of serial MRI of the ACL graft during the first year following ACLR; the hypothesis tested was that normalized MRI signal intensity would differ significantly by ACL graft type, graft source, and postoperative time. Methods: PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL were searched for all studies published prior to June 2018 reporting MRI signal intensity of the ACL graft at multiple time points during the first postoperative year after ACLR. Signal intensity values at 6 and 12 months post-ACLR were normalized to initial measurements and analyzed using a least-squares regression model to study the independent variables of postoperative time, graft type, and graft source on the normalized MRI signal intensity. Results: An effect of graft type (P = 0.001) with interactions of graft type * time (P = 0.012) and graft source * time (P = 0.001) were observed. Post hoc analyses revealed greater predicted normalized MRI signal intensity of patellar tendon autografts than both hamstring (P = 0.008) and hamstring with remnant preservation (P = 0.001) autografts at postoperative month 12. Conclusion: MRI signal varies with graft type, graft source, and time after ACLR. Enhanced graft maturity during the first postoperative year was associated with hamstring autografts, with and without remnant preservation. Serial MRI imaging during the first postoperative year may be clinically useful to identify biologically or mechanically deficient ACL grafts at risk for failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalKnee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Transplants
Autografts
Patellar Ligament
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
Least-Squares Analysis
PubMed

Keywords

  • Anterior cruciate ligament
  • Ligamentization
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Signal–noise-quotient

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Anterior cruciate ligament grafts display differential maturation patterns on magnetic resonance imaging following reconstruction: a systematic review",
abstract = "Purpose: The appearance of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) grafts on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is related to graft maturity and mechanical strength after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Accordingly, the purpose of this review was to quantitatively analyze reports of serial MRI of the ACL graft during the first year following ACLR; the hypothesis tested was that normalized MRI signal intensity would differ significantly by ACL graft type, graft source, and postoperative time. Methods: PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL were searched for all studies published prior to June 2018 reporting MRI signal intensity of the ACL graft at multiple time points during the first postoperative year after ACLR. Signal intensity values at 6 and 12 months post-ACLR were normalized to initial measurements and analyzed using a least-squares regression model to study the independent variables of postoperative time, graft type, and graft source on the normalized MRI signal intensity. Results: An effect of graft type (P = 0.001) with interactions of graft type * time (P = 0.012) and graft source * time (P = 0.001) were observed. Post hoc analyses revealed greater predicted normalized MRI signal intensity of patellar tendon autografts than both hamstring (P = 0.008) and hamstring with remnant preservation (P = 0.001) autografts at postoperative month 12. Conclusion: MRI signal varies with graft type, graft source, and time after ACLR. Enhanced graft maturity during the first postoperative year was associated with hamstring autografts, with and without remnant preservation. Serial MRI imaging during the first postoperative year may be clinically useful to identify biologically or mechanically deficient ACL grafts at risk for failure.",
keywords = "Anterior cruciate ligament, Ligamentization, Magnetic resonance imaging, Signal–noise-quotient",
author = "Panos, {Joseph A.} and Webster, {Kate E.} and Hewett, {Timothy E.}",
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language = "English (US)",
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T1 - Anterior cruciate ligament grafts display differential maturation patterns on magnetic resonance imaging following reconstruction

T2 - a systematic review

AU - Panos, Joseph A.

AU - Webster, Kate E.

AU - Hewett, Timothy E.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Purpose: The appearance of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) grafts on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is related to graft maturity and mechanical strength after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Accordingly, the purpose of this review was to quantitatively analyze reports of serial MRI of the ACL graft during the first year following ACLR; the hypothesis tested was that normalized MRI signal intensity would differ significantly by ACL graft type, graft source, and postoperative time. Methods: PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL were searched for all studies published prior to June 2018 reporting MRI signal intensity of the ACL graft at multiple time points during the first postoperative year after ACLR. Signal intensity values at 6 and 12 months post-ACLR were normalized to initial measurements and analyzed using a least-squares regression model to study the independent variables of postoperative time, graft type, and graft source on the normalized MRI signal intensity. Results: An effect of graft type (P = 0.001) with interactions of graft type * time (P = 0.012) and graft source * time (P = 0.001) were observed. Post hoc analyses revealed greater predicted normalized MRI signal intensity of patellar tendon autografts than both hamstring (P = 0.008) and hamstring with remnant preservation (P = 0.001) autografts at postoperative month 12. Conclusion: MRI signal varies with graft type, graft source, and time after ACLR. Enhanced graft maturity during the first postoperative year was associated with hamstring autografts, with and without remnant preservation. Serial MRI imaging during the first postoperative year may be clinically useful to identify biologically or mechanically deficient ACL grafts at risk for failure.

AB - Purpose: The appearance of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) grafts on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is related to graft maturity and mechanical strength after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Accordingly, the purpose of this review was to quantitatively analyze reports of serial MRI of the ACL graft during the first year following ACLR; the hypothesis tested was that normalized MRI signal intensity would differ significantly by ACL graft type, graft source, and postoperative time. Methods: PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL were searched for all studies published prior to June 2018 reporting MRI signal intensity of the ACL graft at multiple time points during the first postoperative year after ACLR. Signal intensity values at 6 and 12 months post-ACLR were normalized to initial measurements and analyzed using a least-squares regression model to study the independent variables of postoperative time, graft type, and graft source on the normalized MRI signal intensity. Results: An effect of graft type (P = 0.001) with interactions of graft type * time (P = 0.012) and graft source * time (P = 0.001) were observed. Post hoc analyses revealed greater predicted normalized MRI signal intensity of patellar tendon autografts than both hamstring (P = 0.008) and hamstring with remnant preservation (P = 0.001) autografts at postoperative month 12. Conclusion: MRI signal varies with graft type, graft source, and time after ACLR. Enhanced graft maturity during the first postoperative year was associated with hamstring autografts, with and without remnant preservation. Serial MRI imaging during the first postoperative year may be clinically useful to identify biologically or mechanically deficient ACL grafts at risk for failure.

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