Antenatal and postnatal maternal mental health as determinants of infant neurodevelopment at 18 months of age in a mother-child cohort (Rhea Study) in Crete, Greece

Katerina Koutra, Leda Chatzi, Manolis Bagkeris, Maria Vassilaki, Panos Bitsios, Manolis Kogevinas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: A growing body of evidence links poor maternal mental health with negative outcomes on early child development. We examined the effect of antenatal and postnatal maternal mental health on infant neurodevelopment at age 18 months in a population-based mother-child cohort (Rhea Study) in Crete, Greece. Methods: Self-reported measures of maternal depression (EPDS), trait anxiety (STAI-Trait) and personality traits (EPQ-R) were assessed in a sample of women during pregnancy and at 8 weeks postpartum (n = 223). An additional sample of 247 mothers also completed the EPDS scale at 8 weeks postpartum (n = 470). Neurodevelopment at 18 months was assessed with the use of Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (3rd edition). Results: Multivariable linear regression models adjusted for confounders revealed that antenatal depressive symptoms (EPDS ≥ 13) were associated with decrease in cognitive development independently of postnatal depression. High trait anxiety and extraversion were associated with decrease and increase, respectively, in social-emotional development. Also, high trait anxiety and neuroticism had a positive effect on infants' expressive communication. Finally, postpartum depressive symptoms (EPDS ≥ 13) were associated with decrease in cognitive and fine motor development independently of antenatal depression. Conclusions: These findings suggest that antenatal and postnatal maternal psychological well-being has important consequences on early child neurodevelopment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1335-1345
Number of pages11
JournalSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
Volume48
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Rheiformes
Greece
infant
Mental Health
Cohort Studies
mental health
Mothers
Depression
determinants
Postpartum Period
anxiety
Anxiety
Child Development
Linear Models
emotional development
neuroticism
cognitive development
personality traits
Postpartum Depression
social development

Keywords

  • Antenatal maternal mental health
  • Infant neurodevelopment
  • Postpartum depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Antenatal and postnatal maternal mental health as determinants of infant neurodevelopment at 18 months of age in a mother-child cohort (Rhea Study) in Crete, Greece. / Koutra, Katerina; Chatzi, Leda; Bagkeris, Manolis; Vassilaki, Maria; Bitsios, Panos; Kogevinas, Manolis.

In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, Vol. 48, No. 8, 01.08.2013, p. 1335-1345.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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