Aneusomies of chromosomes 8 and Y detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization are prognostic markers for pathological stage C (pT3N0M0) prostate carcinoma

Satoru Takahashi, Antonio Alcaraz, James A. Brown, Thomas J. Borell, John F. Herath, Erik J. Bergstralh, Michael M. Lieber, Robert Brian Jenkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In an attempt to identify new prognostic markers, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) ploidy analysis of tumor tissue from patients with a targeted stage and histological grade of prostate carcinoma. We identified all 227 patients from the Mayo Clinic radical prostatectomy data base who had a high histological grade pathological stage C (pT3N0M0) tumor removed between 1966 and 1987. After histological review of the paraffin-embedded specimen blocks, 181 cases were suitable for FISH analysis using chromosome enumeration probes for chromosomes 7, 8, 10, 12, X, and Y. FISH detected 80 (44%) diploid, 22 (12%) tetraploid, and 79 (44%) aneuploid tumors. The common aneusomies were of chromosomes 7 and 8, which were present in 51 (28%) and 46 (25%) tumors, respectively. Aneusomies of chromosomes 10, 12, X, and Y were observed in 11 (6%), 15 (8%), 12 (7%), and 16 (9%) tumors, respectively. FISH aneuploid tumors showed a trend of more frequent systemic prostate cancer progression than nonaneuploid tumors (P = 0.060). For individual chromosome anomalies, gains of chromosome 8, aneusomy of chromosome 8, and aneusomy of chromosome Y correlated highly with systemic cancer progression (P = 0.006, 0.013, and 0.021, respectively). Gains of chromosome Y and aneusomy of chromosome Y were associated with an increased prostate cancer death rate (P < 0.001 for both). Multivariate analysis showed that gains of chromosome 8 and aneusomy of chromosome Y were significant independent 'predictors' of systemic cancer progression (P = 0.008) and cancer death (P < 0.001), respectively. These results demonstrate that aneuploidy and specific aneusomies detected by FISH are potential markers for a poor prognosis in histological high-grade pathological stage C (pT3N0M0) prostate carcinoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-145
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Cancer Research
Volume2
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1996

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Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
Prostate
Carcinoma
Y Chromosome
Neoplasms
Aneuploidy
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7
Prostatic Neoplasms
Chromosomes
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 10
Tetraploidy
Ploidies
Prostatectomy
Diploidy
Paraffin
Multivariate Analysis
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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Aneusomies of chromosomes 8 and Y detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization are prognostic markers for pathological stage C (pT3N0M0) prostate carcinoma. / Takahashi, Satoru; Alcaraz, Antonio; Brown, James A.; Borell, Thomas J.; Herath, John F.; Bergstralh, Erik J.; Lieber, Michael M.; Jenkins, Robert Brian.

In: Clinical Cancer Research, Vol. 2, No. 1, 01.1996, p. 137-145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takahashi, Satoru ; Alcaraz, Antonio ; Brown, James A. ; Borell, Thomas J. ; Herath, John F. ; Bergstralh, Erik J. ; Lieber, Michael M. ; Jenkins, Robert Brian. / Aneusomies of chromosomes 8 and Y detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization are prognostic markers for pathological stage C (pT3N0M0) prostate carcinoma. In: Clinical Cancer Research. 1996 ; Vol. 2, No. 1. pp. 137-145.
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abstract = "In an attempt to identify new prognostic markers, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) ploidy analysis of tumor tissue from patients with a targeted stage and histological grade of prostate carcinoma. We identified all 227 patients from the Mayo Clinic radical prostatectomy data base who had a high histological grade pathological stage C (pT3N0M0) tumor removed between 1966 and 1987. After histological review of the paraffin-embedded specimen blocks, 181 cases were suitable for FISH analysis using chromosome enumeration probes for chromosomes 7, 8, 10, 12, X, and Y. FISH detected 80 (44{\%}) diploid, 22 (12{\%}) tetraploid, and 79 (44{\%}) aneuploid tumors. The common aneusomies were of chromosomes 7 and 8, which were present in 51 (28{\%}) and 46 (25{\%}) tumors, respectively. Aneusomies of chromosomes 10, 12, X, and Y were observed in 11 (6{\%}), 15 (8{\%}), 12 (7{\%}), and 16 (9{\%}) tumors, respectively. FISH aneuploid tumors showed a trend of more frequent systemic prostate cancer progression than nonaneuploid tumors (P = 0.060). For individual chromosome anomalies, gains of chromosome 8, aneusomy of chromosome 8, and aneusomy of chromosome Y correlated highly with systemic cancer progression (P = 0.006, 0.013, and 0.021, respectively). Gains of chromosome Y and aneusomy of chromosome Y were associated with an increased prostate cancer death rate (P < 0.001 for both). Multivariate analysis showed that gains of chromosome 8 and aneusomy of chromosome Y were significant independent 'predictors' of systemic cancer progression (P = 0.008) and cancer death (P < 0.001), respectively. These results demonstrate that aneuploidy and specific aneusomies detected by FISH are potential markers for a poor prognosis in histological high-grade pathological stage C (pT3N0M0) prostate carcinoma.",
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AU - Alcaraz, Antonio

AU - Brown, James A.

AU - Borell, Thomas J.

AU - Herath, John F.

AU - Bergstralh, Erik J.

AU - Lieber, Michael M.

AU - Jenkins, Robert Brian

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