Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: A pilot study for using longitudinal cognitive and neuropsychological testing for functional outcomes

Tasneem F. Hasan, Neil Haranhalli, Nnenna Mbabuike, Oluwaseun O. Akinduro, Oscar G. Garcia, Beth K. Rush, Otto Pedraza, Rabih G. Tawk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) often sustain substantial cognitive and functional impairment. Traditional outcome measures have emphasized radiographic and gross clinical outcomes, but cognitive and functional outcomes are less frequently documented. This pilot study assessed the feasibility of administering longitudinal cognitive and neuropsychological testing and tracked patterns of functional improvement in aSAH patients. Patients and methods: Standardized cognitive and neuropsychological testing were administered to a prospective cohort of aSAH patients admitted for treatment to our tertiary care center. Thirty consecutive aSAH patients (Hunt and Hess score 1-3) were enrolled over 23-months and baseline evaluations were completed within 24-h after admission. Patients were followed prospectively after treatment (coiling or clipping) at 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12-months. Functional outcome measures included the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory–Questionnaire, and the Functional Activities Questionnaire. Results: Of the 30 patients, 23 (77%) followed-up at 3-months, 21 (70%) at 6-months, and 19 (63%) at 12-months. Improvement from baseline to follow-up at 12-months was noted for general cognitive function (p = .004), memory (p = .025), and executive function (p = .039), with the greatest improvement occurring within 6-months. Daily function also improved mostly within 6-months (p = .022) while changes in neuropsychological disturbances were insignificant from baseline to follow-up at 12-months (p = .216). Conclusion: Standardized cognitive and neuropsychological testing provides metrics for evaluating functional outcomes following treatment of aSAH. The addition of a brief battery of tests to routine clinical and radiographic evaluations is feasible. The main limitations are related to practice and referral patterns, and future studies are needed to evaluate the impact of treatment modalities on functional outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number105941
JournalClinical Neurology and Neurosurgery
Volume194
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2020

Keywords

  • Aneurysm
  • Cerebrovascular
  • Cognition
  • Functional
  • Neuropsychological
  • Outcome
  • Ruptured
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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