Aneurysmal bone cyst

Concept, controversy, clinical presentation, and imaging

M. J. Kransdorf, D. E. Sweet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

326 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The origin of the term 'aneurysmal bone cyst' stems from two cases reported by Jaffe and Lichtenstein [3] in their article on unicameral bone cysts in 1942. In that report, they noted two 'peculiar blood-containing cysts of large size,' which they described as aneurysmal cysts. In a subsequent paper, Jaffe chose the name 'aneurysmal bone cyst' as the descriptive term for this lesion, with the word 'aneurysmal' to emphasize the 'blown-out,' distended contour of the affected bone, and the words 'bone cyst' to underscore that when the lesion is entered through a thin shell of bone, it appears largely as a blood-filled cavity [4] (Fig. 1). As originally described by Jaffe and Lichtenstein in 1942, and in following articles by each [3-6], aneurysmal bone cyst was sufficiently characteristic to identify it as a distinctive radiologic-pathologic entity. However, its nature has remained unclear. In both the original and an ensuing paper on the subject, Jaffe postulated that aneurysmal bone cyst may be a secondary phenomenon due to a hemorrhagic 'blow-out' in a preexisting lesion, which may be destroyed in the process [3, 4]. Lichtenstein also suggested a vascular origin but postulated that the lesion was the result of a 'local circulatory disturbance,' noting that although 'the precise basis for this vascular disturbance is not readily discernible... it could conceivably be thrombosis of a sizable vein, or perhaps an anomalous arteriovenous communication' [5, 6].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)573-580
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume164
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Aneurysmal Bone Cysts
Bone Cysts
Blood Vessels
Cysts
Bone and Bones
Names
Veins
Thrombosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Aneurysmal bone cyst : Concept, controversy, clinical presentation, and imaging. / Kransdorf, M. J.; Sweet, D. E.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 164, No. 3, 1995, p. 573-580.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kransdorf, M. J. ; Sweet, D. E. / Aneurysmal bone cyst : Concept, controversy, clinical presentation, and imaging. In: American Journal of Roentgenology. 1995 ; Vol. 164, No. 3. pp. 573-580.
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