Analysis of the constraint joint loading in the thumb during pipetting

John Z. Wu, Erik W. Sinsel, Kristin D Zhao, Kai Nan An, Frank L. Buczek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dynamic loading on articular joints is essential for the evaluation of the risk of the articulation degeneration associated with occupational activities. In the current study, we analyzed the dynamic constraint loading for the thumb during pipetting. The constraint loading is considered as the loading that has to be carried by the connective tissues of the joints (i.e., the cartilage layer and the ligaments) to maintain the kinematic constraints of the system. The joint loadings are solved using a classic free-body approach, using the external loading and muscle forces, which were obtained in an inverse dynamic approach combined with an optimization procedure in anybody. The constraint forces in the thumb joint obtained in the current study are compared with those obtained in the pinch and grasp tests in a previous study (Cooney and Chao, 1977, Biomechanical Analysis of Static Forces in the Thumb During Hand Function, J. Bone Joint Surg. Am., 59(1), pp. 27-36). The maximal compression force during pipetting is approximately 83% and 60% greater than those obtained in the tip pinch and key pinch, respectively, while substantially smaller than that obtained during grasping. The maximal lateral shear force is approximately six times, 32 times, and 90% greater than those obtained in the tip pinch, key pinch, and grasp, respectively. The maximal dorsal shear force during pipetting is approximately 3.2 and 1.4 times greater than those obtained in the tip pinch and key pinch, respectively, while substantially smaller than that obtained during grasping. Our analysis indicated that the thumb joints are subjected to repetitive, intensive loading during pipetting, compared to other daily activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number084501
JournalJournal of Biomechanical Engineering
Volume137
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

Fingerprint

Thumb
Joints
Hand Strength
Ligaments
Cartilage
Muscle
Bone
Kinematics
Tissue
Biomechanical Phenomena
Connective Tissue
Hand
Bone and Bones
Muscles

Keywords

  • ergonomics
  • joint force
  • joint moment
  • modeling
  • pipette
  • thumb

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Analysis of the constraint joint loading in the thumb during pipetting. / Wu, John Z.; Sinsel, Erik W.; Zhao, Kristin D; An, Kai Nan; Buczek, Frank L.

In: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, Vol. 137, No. 8, 084501, 01.08.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wu, John Z. ; Sinsel, Erik W. ; Zhao, Kristin D ; An, Kai Nan ; Buczek, Frank L. / Analysis of the constraint joint loading in the thumb during pipetting. In: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering. 2015 ; Vol. 137, No. 8.
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