Analysis of joint laxity after total ankle arthroplasty

Cadaver study

Kota Watanabe, Xavier M. Crevoisier, Harold B. Kitaoka, Kristin D Zhao, Lawrence J. Berglund, Kenton R Kaufman, Kai Nan An

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Clinical results of total ankle arthroplasty with early designs were disappointing. Recently-developed ankle prostheses have good mid-term results; however, limited information is available regarding effects of total ankle arthroplasty on ankle laxity. Methods: Eight cadaveric lower extremities were tested with a custom device which enabled measurement of multi-axial forces, moments, and displacement during applied axial, shear, and rotational loading. Tests consisted of anterior-posterior and medial-lateral translation and internal-external rotation of the talus relative to the tibia during axial loads on the tibia simulating body weight (700 N) and an unloaded condition (5 N). Tests were performed in neutral, dorsiflexion, and plantarflexion. Laxity was determined for the intact ankle, and following insertion of an unconstrained total ankle implant, comparing load-displacement curve. Findings: Laxity after total ankle arthroplasty did not approximate the normal ankle in most conditions tested. Displacement was significantly greater for total ankle arthroplasty in both posterior and lateral translation, and internal rotation, with 5 N axial loading, and anterior-posterior, medial-lateral translation, and internal-external rotation for 700 N axial loading. For the 700 N axial load condition, in the neutral ankle position, total anterior-posterior translation averaged 0.4 mm (SD 0.2 mm), but 6.0 mm (SD 1.5 mm) after total ankle arthroplasty (P < 0.01). This study demonstrated more laxity in the replaced ankle than normal ankle for both unloaded and 700 N axially loaded conditions. Interpretation: These data indicate the increased responsibility of the ligaments for ankle laxity after total ankle arthroplasty and suggest the importance of meticulous ligament reconstruction with total ankle arthroplasty operations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)655-660
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Biomechanics
Volume24
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009

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Joint Instability
Cadaver
Ankle
Arthroplasty
Weight-Bearing
Tibia
Ligaments
Talus

Keywords

  • Ankle stability
  • Biomechanics
  • Cadaver
  • Foot and ankle
  • Total ankle arthroplasty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Biophysics

Cite this

Analysis of joint laxity after total ankle arthroplasty : Cadaver study. / Watanabe, Kota; Crevoisier, Xavier M.; Kitaoka, Harold B.; Zhao, Kristin D; Berglund, Lawrence J.; Kaufman, Kenton R; An, Kai Nan.

In: Clinical Biomechanics, Vol. 24, No. 8, 10.2009, p. 655-660.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Watanabe, Kota ; Crevoisier, Xavier M. ; Kitaoka, Harold B. ; Zhao, Kristin D ; Berglund, Lawrence J. ; Kaufman, Kenton R ; An, Kai Nan. / Analysis of joint laxity after total ankle arthroplasty : Cadaver study. In: Clinical Biomechanics. 2009 ; Vol. 24, No. 8. pp. 655-660.
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abstract = "Background: Clinical results of total ankle arthroplasty with early designs were disappointing. Recently-developed ankle prostheses have good mid-term results; however, limited information is available regarding effects of total ankle arthroplasty on ankle laxity. Methods: Eight cadaveric lower extremities were tested with a custom device which enabled measurement of multi-axial forces, moments, and displacement during applied axial, shear, and rotational loading. Tests consisted of anterior-posterior and medial-lateral translation and internal-external rotation of the talus relative to the tibia during axial loads on the tibia simulating body weight (700 N) and an unloaded condition (5 N). Tests were performed in neutral, dorsiflexion, and plantarflexion. Laxity was determined for the intact ankle, and following insertion of an unconstrained total ankle implant, comparing load-displacement curve. Findings: Laxity after total ankle arthroplasty did not approximate the normal ankle in most conditions tested. Displacement was significantly greater for total ankle arthroplasty in both posterior and lateral translation, and internal rotation, with 5 N axial loading, and anterior-posterior, medial-lateral translation, and internal-external rotation for 700 N axial loading. For the 700 N axial load condition, in the neutral ankle position, total anterior-posterior translation averaged 0.4 mm (SD 0.2 mm), but 6.0 mm (SD 1.5 mm) after total ankle arthroplasty (P < 0.01). This study demonstrated more laxity in the replaced ankle than normal ankle for both unloaded and 700 N axially loaded conditions. Interpretation: These data indicate the increased responsibility of the ligaments for ankle laxity after total ankle arthroplasty and suggest the importance of meticulous ligament reconstruction with total ankle arthroplasty operations.",
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