An Update on the Predominant Forms of Vertigo in Children and Their Associated Findings on Balance Function Testing

Devin L. McCaslin, Jamie M. Bogle, Gary P. Jacobson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In recent years there has been renewed interest in evaluating vestibular function in young children. This revival is due, at least in part, to emphasis on evidence-based practice in health care and the realization that although many children describe or demonstrate symptoms and signs associated with vestibular dysfunction, a solid evidence base has not been established for which children will benefit from testing. Furthermore, there is a paucity of information regarding age-appropriate normative data for components of the vestibular test battery that are considered to be essential. Although there are many challenges associated with evaluating vestibular function in children, information that will help guide clinicians in their decisions of which children to test, which tests to select and/or modify, and how to interpret results is emerging. This chapter describes the five most common causes of vertigo and dizziness in the pediatric population and the reported vestibular findings associated with these disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDizziness and Vertigo Across the Lifespan
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages63-81
Number of pages19
ISBN (Electronic)9780323551373
ISBN (Print)9780323551366
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • Auditory neuropathy
  • Benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood
  • Electronystagmography
  • Otitis media
  • Rotary chair
  • Trauma
  • Vestibular
  • Vestibular neuritis
  • Videonystagmography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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