An assessment of interactions between hepatitis C virus and herpesvirus reactivation in liver transplant recipients using molecular surveillance

Atul Humar, Kenneth Washburn, Richard Freeman, Carlos V. Paya, Houria Mouas, Emma Alecock, Raymund R Razonable

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been proposed to have immunomodulatory effects in transplant recipients and may promote herpesvirus reactivation. To assess this, we compared the incidence of herpesvirus reactivation in HCV-positive and HCV-negative liver transplant recipients. Quantitative viral load testing was performed at regular intervals posttransplantation for cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesviruses (HHV) 6, 7, and 8, and varicella zoster virus (VZV) in 177 liver transplant patients who were HCV-positive (n = 60) or HCV-negative (n = 117). The incidence of CMV disease, CMV viremia, and the peak CMV viral load was not significantly different in HCV-positive vs. HCV-negative patients. Similarly, no differences in HHV-6 or EBV reactivation were observed. HHV-8 or VZV viremia was not detected in any patient in the study. A lower incidence of HHV-7 infection occurred in HCV-positive patients vs. HCV-negative patients (47.6% vs. 72.7%; P = 0.006). In conclusion, these results suggest that HCV infection does not appear to promote herpesvirus reactivation after liver transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1422-1427
Number of pages6
JournalLiver Transplantation
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007

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Herpesviridae
Hepacivirus
Liver
Cytomegalovirus
Human Herpesvirus 7
Human Herpesvirus 6
Human Herpesvirus 8
Human Herpesvirus 3
Viremia
Viral Load
Human Herpesvirus 4
Incidence
Transplant Recipients
Herpesviridae Infections
Virus Diseases
Liver Transplantation
Transplants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

Cite this

An assessment of interactions between hepatitis C virus and herpesvirus reactivation in liver transplant recipients using molecular surveillance. / Humar, Atul; Washburn, Kenneth; Freeman, Richard; Paya, Carlos V.; Mouas, Houria; Alecock, Emma; Razonable, Raymund R.

In: Liver Transplantation, Vol. 13, No. 10, 10.2007, p. 1422-1427.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Humar, Atul ; Washburn, Kenneth ; Freeman, Richard ; Paya, Carlos V. ; Mouas, Houria ; Alecock, Emma ; Razonable, Raymund R. / An assessment of interactions between hepatitis C virus and herpesvirus reactivation in liver transplant recipients using molecular surveillance. In: Liver Transplantation. 2007 ; Vol. 13, No. 10. pp. 1422-1427.
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