An airtight approach to the inebriometer: From construction to application with volatile anesthetics

Adam G. Dawson, Paniz Heidari, Sudhindra R. Gadagkar, Michael J. Murray, Gerald B. Call

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The mechanism by which inhaled anesthetics work is not fully understood, although they have been extensively used. Much research has been done showing the likelihood that there is more than one pathway or mechanism of action. A long-term goal of our laboratory is to decipher these mechanisms using Drosophila melanogaster, an excellent model organism for this purpose. In order to do this, we have modified and constructed an apparatus called the inebriometer to quantitatively analyze the response of flies to inhaled anesthetics. While the inebriometer is not new to the fly community, our updated design provides a relatively low-labor, high-throughput means for performing screens in search of genes involved in the anesthetic mechanism. Here we describe our construction of an airtight inebriometer that we have designed for this purpose. We also provide data that validates this apparatus and establishes a procedure for its use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFly
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Airtight
  • Anesthesia
  • Behavioral assay
  • Construction
  • Drosophila
  • Drug response
  • Inebriometer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

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    Dawson, A. G., Heidari, P., Gadagkar, S. R., Murray, M. J., & Call, G. B. (2013). An airtight approach to the inebriometer: From construction to application with volatile anesthetics. Fly, 7(2). https://doi.org/10.4161/fly.24142