An Acute Stroke Evaluation App: A Practice Improvement Project

Mark N. Rubin, Jennifer E. Fugate, Alejandro Rabinstein, Kelly Flemming, Kevin M Barrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A point-of-care workflow checklist in the form of an iOS (iPhone Operating System) app for use by stroke providers was introduced with the objective of standardizing acute stroke evaluation and documentation at 2 affiliated academic medical centers. Providers used the app in unselected, consecutive patients undergoing acute stroke evaluation in an emergency department or hospital setting between August 2012 and January 2013 and August 2013 and February 2014. Satisfaction surveys were prospectively collected pre- and postintervention from residents, staff neurologists, and clinical data specialists. Residents (20 preintervention and 16 postintervention), staff neurologists (6 pre and 5 post), and clinical data specialists (4 pre and 4 post) participated in this study. All 16 (100%) residents had increased satisfaction with their ability to perform an acute stroke evaluation postintervention but only 9 (56%) of 16 felt the app was more help than hindrance. Historical controls aligned with preintervention results. Staff neurologists conveyed increased satisfaction with resident presentations and decision making when compared to preintervention surveys. Stroke clinical data specialists estimated a 50% decrease in data abstraction when the app data were used in the clinical note. Concomitant effect on door-to-needle (DTN) time at 1 site, although not a primary study measure, was also evaluated. At that 1 center, the mean DTN time decreased by 16 minutes when compared to the corresponding months from the year prior. The point-of-care acute stroke workflow checklist app may assist trainees in presenting findings in a standardized manner and reduce data abstraction time. The app may help reduce DTN time, but this requires further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-69
Number of pages7
JournalThe Neurohospitalist
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Stroke
Point-of-Care Systems
Needles
Workflow
Checklist
Aptitude
Documentation
Hospital Emergency Service
Decision Making
Neurologists
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • mhealth
  • neurohospitalist
  • quality
  • stroke
  • stroke and cerebrovascular disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

An Acute Stroke Evaluation App : A Practice Improvement Project. / Rubin, Mark N.; Fugate, Jennifer E.; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Flemming, Kelly; Barrett, Kevin M.

In: The Neurohospitalist, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2015, p. 63-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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