An accelerometer-based earpiece to monitor and quantify physical activity

Chinmay Manohar, Shelly McCrady, Ioannis T. Pavlidis, James A. Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Physical activity is important in ill-health. Inexpensive, accurate and precise devices could help assess daily activity. We integrated novel activity-sensing technology into an earpiece used with portable musicplayers and phones; the physical-activity-sensing earpiece (PASE). Here we examined whether the PASE could accurately and precisely detect physical activity and measure its intensity and thence predict energy expenditure. Methods: Experiment 1: 18 subjects wore PASE with different body postures and during graded walking. Energy expenditure was measured using indirect calorimetry. Experiment 2: 8 subjects wore the earpiece and walked a known distance. Experiment 3: 8 subjects wore the earpiece and 'jogged' at 3.5mph. Results: The earpiece correctly distinguished lying from sitting/standing and distinguished standing still from walking (76/76 cases). PASE output showed excellent sequential increases with increased in walking velocity and energy expenditure (r 2 > .9). The PASE prediction of free-living walking velocity was, 2.5 ± (SD) 0.18 mph c.f. actual velocity, 2.5 ± 0.16 mph. The earpiece successfully distinguished walking at 3.5 mph from 'jogging' at the same velocity (P < .001). Conclusions: The subjects tolerated the earpiece well and were comfortable wearing it. The PASE can therefore be used to reliably monitor free-living physical activity and its associated energy expenditure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)781-789
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Physical Activity and Health
Volume6
Issue number6
StatePublished - Nov 2009

Fingerprint

Walking
Energy Metabolism
Jogging
Indirect Calorimetry
Posture
Technology
Equipment and Supplies
Health

Keywords

  • Energy expenditure
  • Mobile devices
  • Non-exercise activity thermogenesis
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Manohar, C., McCrady, S., Pavlidis, I. T., & Levine, J. A. (2009). An accelerometer-based earpiece to monitor and quantify physical activity. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 6(6), 781-789.

An accelerometer-based earpiece to monitor and quantify physical activity. / Manohar, Chinmay; McCrady, Shelly; Pavlidis, Ioannis T.; Levine, James A.

In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, Vol. 6, No. 6, 11.2009, p. 781-789.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Manohar, C, McCrady, S, Pavlidis, IT & Levine, JA 2009, 'An accelerometer-based earpiece to monitor and quantify physical activity', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, vol. 6, no. 6, pp. 781-789.
Manohar, Chinmay ; McCrady, Shelly ; Pavlidis, Ioannis T. ; Levine, James A. / An accelerometer-based earpiece to monitor and quantify physical activity. In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health. 2009 ; Vol. 6, No. 6. pp. 781-789.
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