Amyloid burden correlates with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease presenting with aphasia

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Abstract

Background and purpose: A subset of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) present with early and prominent language deficits. It is unclear whether the burden of underlying β-amyloid pathology is associated with language or general cognitive impairment in these subjects. Methods: The relationship between cortical β-amyloid burden on [11C]Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) positron emission tomography (PET) and performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III), the Boston Naming Test (BNT) and the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) was assessed using regression and correlation analyses in subjects presenting with aphasia who showed β-amyloid deposition on PiB PET. Results: The global PiB ratio was inversely correlated with MoCA (P = 0.02) and the WMS-III Visual Reproduction (VR) subtest (VR I, P = 0.02; VR II, P = 0.04). However, the correlations between PiB ratio, BNT (P = 0.13), WAB aphasia quotient (P = 0.11) and WAB repetition scores (P = 0.34) were not significant. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that an increased cortical β-amyloid burden is associated with cognitive impairment, but not language deficits, in AD subjects presenting with aphasia. The results suggest that β-amyloid deposition could be partly contributing to impaired cognition in such patients whilst language dysfunction may be more influenced by other pathological mechanisms, perhaps downstream pathways of β-amyloid deposition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1040-1043
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Journal of Neurology
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Aphasia
Amyloid
Alzheimer Disease
Language
Reproduction
Wechsler Scales
Positron-Emission Tomography
Neuropsychological Tests
Cognition
Cognitive Dysfunction
Regression Analysis
Pathology
2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole

Keywords

  • Aphasia
  • Beta-amyloid
  • Dementia
  • PET
  • PiB

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

@article{9123407842ed4062b825f5054e0ddd52,
title = "Amyloid burden correlates with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease presenting with aphasia",
abstract = "Background and purpose: A subset of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) present with early and prominent language deficits. It is unclear whether the burden of underlying β-amyloid pathology is associated with language or general cognitive impairment in these subjects. Methods: The relationship between cortical β-amyloid burden on [11C]Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) positron emission tomography (PET) and performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III), the Boston Naming Test (BNT) and the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) was assessed using regression and correlation analyses in subjects presenting with aphasia who showed β-amyloid deposition on PiB PET. Results: The global PiB ratio was inversely correlated with MoCA (P = 0.02) and the WMS-III Visual Reproduction (VR) subtest (VR I, P = 0.02; VR II, P = 0.04). However, the correlations between PiB ratio, BNT (P = 0.13), WAB aphasia quotient (P = 0.11) and WAB repetition scores (P = 0.34) were not significant. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that an increased cortical β-amyloid burden is associated with cognitive impairment, but not language deficits, in AD subjects presenting with aphasia. The results suggest that β-amyloid deposition could be partly contributing to impaired cognition in such patients whilst language dysfunction may be more influenced by other pathological mechanisms, perhaps downstream pathways of β-amyloid deposition.",
keywords = "Aphasia, Beta-amyloid, Dementia, PET, PiB",
author = "Y. Jung and Whitwell, {Jennifer Lynn} and Duffy, {J. R.} and Strand, {E. A.} and Machulda, {Mary Margaret} and Senjem, {M. L.} and Val Lowe and Jack, {Clifford R Jr.} and Josephs, {Keith Anthony}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1111/ene.12331",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "1040--1043",
journal = "European Journal of Neurology",
issn = "1351-5101",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Amyloid burden correlates with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease presenting with aphasia

AU - Jung, Y.

AU - Whitwell, Jennifer Lynn

AU - Duffy, J. R.

AU - Strand, E. A.

AU - Machulda, Mary Margaret

AU - Senjem, M. L.

AU - Lowe, Val

AU - Jack, Clifford R Jr.

AU - Josephs, Keith Anthony

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Background and purpose: A subset of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) present with early and prominent language deficits. It is unclear whether the burden of underlying β-amyloid pathology is associated with language or general cognitive impairment in these subjects. Methods: The relationship between cortical β-amyloid burden on [11C]Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) positron emission tomography (PET) and performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III), the Boston Naming Test (BNT) and the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) was assessed using regression and correlation analyses in subjects presenting with aphasia who showed β-amyloid deposition on PiB PET. Results: The global PiB ratio was inversely correlated with MoCA (P = 0.02) and the WMS-III Visual Reproduction (VR) subtest (VR I, P = 0.02; VR II, P = 0.04). However, the correlations between PiB ratio, BNT (P = 0.13), WAB aphasia quotient (P = 0.11) and WAB repetition scores (P = 0.34) were not significant. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that an increased cortical β-amyloid burden is associated with cognitive impairment, but not language deficits, in AD subjects presenting with aphasia. The results suggest that β-amyloid deposition could be partly contributing to impaired cognition in such patients whilst language dysfunction may be more influenced by other pathological mechanisms, perhaps downstream pathways of β-amyloid deposition.

AB - Background and purpose: A subset of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) present with early and prominent language deficits. It is unclear whether the burden of underlying β-amyloid pathology is associated with language or general cognitive impairment in these subjects. Methods: The relationship between cortical β-amyloid burden on [11C]Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) positron emission tomography (PET) and performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III), the Boston Naming Test (BNT) and the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) was assessed using regression and correlation analyses in subjects presenting with aphasia who showed β-amyloid deposition on PiB PET. Results: The global PiB ratio was inversely correlated with MoCA (P = 0.02) and the WMS-III Visual Reproduction (VR) subtest (VR I, P = 0.02; VR II, P = 0.04). However, the correlations between PiB ratio, BNT (P = 0.13), WAB aphasia quotient (P = 0.11) and WAB repetition scores (P = 0.34) were not significant. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that an increased cortical β-amyloid burden is associated with cognitive impairment, but not language deficits, in AD subjects presenting with aphasia. The results suggest that β-amyloid deposition could be partly contributing to impaired cognition in such patients whilst language dysfunction may be more influenced by other pathological mechanisms, perhaps downstream pathways of β-amyloid deposition.

KW - Aphasia

KW - Beta-amyloid

KW - Dementia

KW - PET

KW - PiB

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U2 - 10.1111/ene.12331

DO - 10.1111/ene.12331

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SP - 1040

EP - 1043

JO - European Journal of Neurology

JF - European Journal of Neurology

SN - 1351-5101

IS - 7

ER -