Amebiasis

Bobbi S. Pritt, C. Graham Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

103 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Amebiasis is defined as infection with Entamoeba histolytica, regardless of associated symptomatology. In resource-rich nations, this parasitic protozoan is seen primarily in travelers to and emigrants from endemic areas. Infections range from asymptomatic colonization to amebic colitis and life-threatening abscesses. Importantly, disease may occur months to years after exposure. Although E histolytica was previously thought to infect 10% of the world's population, 2 morphologically identical but genetically distinct and apparently nonpathogenic Entamoeba species are now recognized as causing most asymptomatic cases. To avoid unnecessary and possibly harmful therapies, clinicians should follow the diagnostic and treatment guidelines of the World Health Organization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1154-1160
Number of pages7
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume83
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Amebiasis
Entamoeba
Amoebic Dysentery
Entamoeba histolytica
Asymptomatic Infections
Abscess
Guidelines
Therapeutics
Infection
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pritt, B. S., & Graham Clark, C. (2008). Amebiasis. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 83(10), 1154-1160. https://doi.org/10.4065/83.10.1154

Amebiasis. / Pritt, Bobbi S.; Graham Clark, C.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 83, No. 10, 2008, p. 1154-1160.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Pritt, BS & Graham Clark, C 2008, 'Amebiasis', Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 83, no. 10, pp. 1154-1160. https://doi.org/10.4065/83.10.1154
Pritt BS, Graham Clark C. Amebiasis. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2008;83(10):1154-1160. https://doi.org/10.4065/83.10.1154
Pritt, Bobbi S. ; Graham Clark, C. / Amebiasis. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2008 ; Vol. 83, No. 10. pp. 1154-1160.
@article{8ae2ac35bd384909964e3f72fc20ffd8,
title = "Amebiasis",
abstract = "Amebiasis is defined as infection with Entamoeba histolytica, regardless of associated symptomatology. In resource-rich nations, this parasitic protozoan is seen primarily in travelers to and emigrants from endemic areas. Infections range from asymptomatic colonization to amebic colitis and life-threatening abscesses. Importantly, disease may occur months to years after exposure. Although E histolytica was previously thought to infect 10{\%} of the world's population, 2 morphologically identical but genetically distinct and apparently nonpathogenic Entamoeba species are now recognized as causing most asymptomatic cases. To avoid unnecessary and possibly harmful therapies, clinicians should follow the diagnostic and treatment guidelines of the World Health Organization.",
author = "Pritt, {Bobbi S.} and {Graham Clark}, C.",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.4065/83.10.1154",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "83",
pages = "1154--1160",
journal = "Mayo Clinic Proceedings",
issn = "0025-6196",
publisher = "Elsevier Science",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Amebiasis

AU - Pritt, Bobbi S.

AU - Graham Clark, C.

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Amebiasis is defined as infection with Entamoeba histolytica, regardless of associated symptomatology. In resource-rich nations, this parasitic protozoan is seen primarily in travelers to and emigrants from endemic areas. Infections range from asymptomatic colonization to amebic colitis and life-threatening abscesses. Importantly, disease may occur months to years after exposure. Although E histolytica was previously thought to infect 10% of the world's population, 2 morphologically identical but genetically distinct and apparently nonpathogenic Entamoeba species are now recognized as causing most asymptomatic cases. To avoid unnecessary and possibly harmful therapies, clinicians should follow the diagnostic and treatment guidelines of the World Health Organization.

AB - Amebiasis is defined as infection with Entamoeba histolytica, regardless of associated symptomatology. In resource-rich nations, this parasitic protozoan is seen primarily in travelers to and emigrants from endemic areas. Infections range from asymptomatic colonization to amebic colitis and life-threatening abscesses. Importantly, disease may occur months to years after exposure. Although E histolytica was previously thought to infect 10% of the world's population, 2 morphologically identical but genetically distinct and apparently nonpathogenic Entamoeba species are now recognized as causing most asymptomatic cases. To avoid unnecessary and possibly harmful therapies, clinicians should follow the diagnostic and treatment guidelines of the World Health Organization.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=54049096302&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=54049096302&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4065/83.10.1154

DO - 10.4065/83.10.1154

M3 - Review article

C2 - 18828976

AN - SCOPUS:54049096302

VL - 83

SP - 1154

EP - 1160

JO - Mayo Clinic Proceedings

JF - Mayo Clinic Proceedings

SN - 0025-6196

IS - 10

ER -