Alteration of the calcium content in inner hair cells of the cochlea of the guinea pig after acute noise trauma with and without application of the organic calcium channel blocker diltiazem

Jan Maurer, Ulf Rüdiger Heinrich, Michael L. Hinni, Wolf Mann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Calcium ions are known to be important to the process of signal transduction across the apical and basal sides of the inner hair cells. Calcium channel antagonists have been demonstrated by light microscopy to provide protection against acoustic trauma. To evaluate the protective effect of calcium channel blocker on the inner ear cells to noise exposure, the amount of the histochemical reaction products formed in the cytoplasm of the inner hair cells of the guinea pig after application of pyroantimonate was measured by an image processing system connected to an energy-filtering transmission electron microscope (EFTEM). Compared to untreated control specimens (experimental animal group I) the amount of precipitable calcium had clearly increased in the inner hair cells of noise-exposed cochleae 60 h after an acute noise trauma (group III). In addition, small electron-lucent areas could be identified in the cytoplasm of the hair cells probably representing damage to the cellular fine structure. When the calcium channel blocker diltiazem was administered without any additional noise exposure the calcium content was drastically reduced in the inner hair cells (group II), but when the antagonist was given before and after acute noise trauma (group IV), the calcium content in the inner hair cells was nearly compared to the amount determined in the untreated group of animals. The role of diltiazem is discussed in respect of tissue protection and to the maintenance of the calcium-dependent physiological processes in the inner hair cells during signal transduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)328-333
Number of pages6
JournalORL
Volume61
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1999

Fingerprint

Inner Auditory Hair Cells
Diltiazem
Cochlea
Calcium Channel Blockers
Noise
Guinea Pigs
Calcium
Wounds and Injuries
Signal Transduction
Cytoplasm
Electrons
Physiological Phenomena
Noise-Induced Hearing Loss
Inner Ear
Cellular Structures
Microscopy
Maintenance
Ions
Light

Keywords

  • Calcium channel blocker
  • Calcium localization
  • Cochlea
  • Diltiazem
  • Guinea pig
  • Hair cell
  • Noise exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Alteration of the calcium content in inner hair cells of the cochlea of the guinea pig after acute noise trauma with and without application of the organic calcium channel blocker diltiazem. / Maurer, Jan; Heinrich, Ulf Rüdiger; Hinni, Michael L.; Mann, Wolf.

In: ORL, Vol. 61, No. 6, 11.1999, p. 328-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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