Alcoholic liver disease-related mortality in the united states: 1980-2003

Helga Paula, Sumeet K. Asrani, Nicholas C. Boetticher, Rachel Pedersen, Vijay Shah, W. Ray Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Data on temporal changes in alcoholic liver disease (ALD)-related mortality in the United States are lacking. This longitudinal assessment is important, given the divergent data on trends in worldwide ALD-related mortality, concerns for underestimation of mortality attributed to ALD in previous investigations, and shifting attention to hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related mortality. Methods: We analyzed mortality data compiled in the multiple cause-of-death public-use data file from the National Vital Statistics System from 1980 to 2003 using categorization by both International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 and ICD-10 systems. The main outcome measure was age-and sex-adjusted death rates attributable to ALD, HCV, or both (ALD/HCV) listed as immediate or underlying cause of death. Results: A total of 287,365 deaths were observed over the 24-year period. Age-and sex-adjusted incidence rates of ALD-related deaths decreased from 6.9/100,000 persons in 1980 to 4.4/100,000 persons by 2003. After introduction of HCV diagnostic testing, HCV-related liver mortality increased to 2.9/100,000 persons by 2003. Death rates for subjects with concomitant ALD/HCV rose to 0.2/100,000 persons by 1999 and then remained unchanged through 2003. Age-specific mortality related to ALD was highest in the ages of 45-64 years. Between 1980 and 2003, the age-and sex-adjusted ALD-related mortality (per 100,000 persons) decreased from 6.3 to 4.5 among Caucasians, 11.6 to 4.1 among African Americans, and 8.0 to 3.7 among the other race group. Conclusions: Despite a decline in ALD-related mortality, the proportion of alcohol-related liver deaths is still considerably large and comparable in scope to that of HCV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1782-1787
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume105
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010

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Alcoholic Liver Diseases
Hepacivirus
Mortality
International Classification of Diseases
Cause of Death
Vital Statistics
Information Storage and Retrieval
Liver
African Americans
Alcohols
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Paula, H., Asrani, S. K., Boetticher, N. C., Pedersen, R., Shah, V., & Kim, W. R. (2010). Alcoholic liver disease-related mortality in the united states: 1980-2003. American Journal of Gastroenterology, 105(8), 1782-1787. https://doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2010.46

Alcoholic liver disease-related mortality in the united states : 1980-2003. / Paula, Helga; Asrani, Sumeet K.; Boetticher, Nicholas C.; Pedersen, Rachel; Shah, Vijay; Kim, W. Ray.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 105, No. 8, 08.2010, p. 1782-1787.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Paula, H, Asrani, SK, Boetticher, NC, Pedersen, R, Shah, V & Kim, WR 2010, 'Alcoholic liver disease-related mortality in the united states: 1980-2003', American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 105, no. 8, pp. 1782-1787. https://doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2010.46
Paula, Helga ; Asrani, Sumeet K. ; Boetticher, Nicholas C. ; Pedersen, Rachel ; Shah, Vijay ; Kim, W. Ray. / Alcoholic liver disease-related mortality in the united states : 1980-2003. In: American Journal of Gastroenterology. 2010 ; Vol. 105, No. 8. pp. 1782-1787.
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