Aggressive Multimodality Therapy for Patients with Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer

Is There a Role for Amifostine?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer die from their disease, despite complete surgical extirpation of tumor or institution of aggressive, multimodality treatment. Nevertheless, a favorable trend emerging in the management of such patients is that "more therapy is better." This review describes several studies indicating that aggressive, combined-modality therapy provides a survival advantage for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. An ongoing North Central Cancer Treatment Group trial further capitalizes on the concept of "more is better," and tests subcutaneous amifostine (Ethyol, WR-2721; MedImmune, Inc, Gaithersburg, MD) to balance the need for aggressive therapy with the need to mitigate associated toxicity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-75
Number of pages4
JournalSeminars in Oncology
Volume30
Issue number6 SUPPL. 18
StatePublished - Dec 2003

Fingerprint

Amifostine
Esophageal Neoplasms
Combined Modality Therapy
Therapeutics
Neoplasms
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Aggressive Multimodality Therapy for Patients with Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer : Is There a Role for Amifostine? / Jatoi, Aminah.

In: Seminars in Oncology, Vol. 30, No. 6 SUPPL. 18, 12.2003, p. 72-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a6080456089049b1b03e9cb7b3ae34e7,
title = "Aggressive Multimodality Therapy for Patients with Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer: Is There a Role for Amifostine?",
abstract = "Most patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer die from their disease, despite complete surgical extirpation of tumor or institution of aggressive, multimodality treatment. Nevertheless, a favorable trend emerging in the management of such patients is that {"}more therapy is better.{"} This review describes several studies indicating that aggressive, combined-modality therapy provides a survival advantage for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. An ongoing North Central Cancer Treatment Group trial further capitalizes on the concept of {"}more is better,{"} and tests subcutaneous amifostine (Ethyol, WR-2721; MedImmune, Inc, Gaithersburg, MD) to balance the need for aggressive therapy with the need to mitigate associated toxicity.",
author = "Aminah Jatoi",
year = "2003",
month = "12",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "72--75",
journal = "Seminars in Oncology",
issn = "0093-7754",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "6 SUPPL. 18",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Aggressive Multimodality Therapy for Patients with Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer

T2 - Is There a Role for Amifostine?

AU - Jatoi, Aminah

PY - 2003/12

Y1 - 2003/12

N2 - Most patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer die from their disease, despite complete surgical extirpation of tumor or institution of aggressive, multimodality treatment. Nevertheless, a favorable trend emerging in the management of such patients is that "more therapy is better." This review describes several studies indicating that aggressive, combined-modality therapy provides a survival advantage for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. An ongoing North Central Cancer Treatment Group trial further capitalizes on the concept of "more is better," and tests subcutaneous amifostine (Ethyol, WR-2721; MedImmune, Inc, Gaithersburg, MD) to balance the need for aggressive therapy with the need to mitigate associated toxicity.

AB - Most patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer die from their disease, despite complete surgical extirpation of tumor or institution of aggressive, multimodality treatment. Nevertheless, a favorable trend emerging in the management of such patients is that "more therapy is better." This review describes several studies indicating that aggressive, combined-modality therapy provides a survival advantage for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. An ongoing North Central Cancer Treatment Group trial further capitalizes on the concept of "more is better," and tests subcutaneous amifostine (Ethyol, WR-2721; MedImmune, Inc, Gaithersburg, MD) to balance the need for aggressive therapy with the need to mitigate associated toxicity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=1642558239&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=1642558239&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 72

EP - 75

JO - Seminars in Oncology

JF - Seminars in Oncology

SN - 0093-7754

IS - 6 SUPPL. 18

ER -