Ageing reduces the compensatory vasodilatation during hypoxic exercise: The role of nitric oxide

Darren P. Casey, Branton G. Walker, Timothy B Curry, Michael Joseph Joyner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We tested the hypotheses that (1) the compensatory vasodilatation in skeletal muscle during hypoxic exercise is attenuated in ageing humans and (2) local inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in the forearm of ageing humans will have less impact on the compensatory dilatation during rhythmic exercise with hypoxia, due to a smaller compensatory dilator response. Eleven healthy older subjects (61 ± 2 years) performed forearm exercise (10% and 20% of maximum) during saline infusion (control) and NO synthase inhibition (N G-monomethyl-l-arginine; l-NMMA) under normoxic and normocapnic hypoxic (80% arterial O 2 saturation) conditions. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; ml min -1 (100 mmHg) -1) was calculated from forearm blood flow (ml min -1) and blood pressure (mmHg). To further examine the effects of ageing on the compensatory vasodilator response to hypoxic exercise we compared the difference in ΔFVC (% change compared to respective normoxic exercise trial) between the older subjects (present study) and previously published data from an identical protocol in young subjects. During the control condition, the compensatory vasodilator response to hypoxia was similar between the old and young groups at 10% exercise (28 ± 6%vs. 40 ± 8%, P= 0.11) but attenuated at 20% exercise (14 ± 4%vs. 31 ± 6%, P < 0.05). l-NMMA during hypoxic exercise only blunted the compensatory vasodilator response in the young group (P < 0.05). Our data suggest that ageing reduces the compensatory vasodilator response to hypoxic exercise via blunted NO signalling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1477-1488
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Physiology
Volume589
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

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Vasodilation
Nitric Oxide
Exercise
Vasodilator Agents
Forearm
Nitric Oxide Synthase
Blood Vessels
Arginine
Dilatation
Healthy Volunteers
Skeletal Muscle
Blood Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Ageing reduces the compensatory vasodilatation during hypoxic exercise : The role of nitric oxide. / Casey, Darren P.; Walker, Branton G.; Curry, Timothy B; Joyner, Michael Joseph.

In: Journal of Physiology, Vol. 589, No. 6, 03.2011, p. 1477-1488.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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