Age-related hip fractures in men: Clinical spectrum and short-term outcomes

G. Poor, E. J. Atkinson, D. G. Lewallen, W. M. O'Fallon, L. J. Melton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clinical spectrum, treatment and short-term outcomes were assessed among the 131 Rochester, Minnesota, men who contracted an initial hip fracture due to moderate trauma during 1978-89. Three-fourths of falls leading to hip fracture occurred indoors with little seasonality, and 91% of fractures were in men 65 years of age or older. The ratio of cervical to intertro-chanteric femur fractures was 1.4:1, and there was a tendency toward more neurological conditions among the patients with cervical fractures. Hemiarthroplasty and total hip replacement were mostly performed for cervical fractures, while internal fixation was preferred for intertrochanteric fractures. In-hospital mortality was 11.5%, and the 30-day case fatality rate was 16.0%. Age and postoperative deterioration of mental status significantly increased the risk of early death, the latter even after adjustment in a multivariate model, while comorbidity had a suggestive but not statistically significant influence on mortality. More than half the men were discharged to nursing homes, and 79% of the patients who survived at 1 year resided in nursing homes or intermediate care facilities or were attended by home care. Only 41% of survivors recovered their prefracture level of functioning and nearly 60% of patients limped and required a cane or walker. After implementation of the prospective payment system in 1984, the length of hospital stay was reduced, but there was no change in early mortality rates, in the duration of physical therapy following fracture or in attendance at nursing homes. The results of this population-based study demonstrate the strong impact of hip fractures on short-term outcomes in men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-426
Number of pages8
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1995

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Hip Fractures
Nursing Homes
Mortality
Intermediate Care Facilities
Length of Stay
Prospective Payment System
Hemiarthroplasty
Internal Fracture Fixation
Social Adjustment
Canes
Hip Replacement Arthroplasties
Home Care Services
Hospital Mortality
Femur
Survivors
Comorbidity
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics
Population

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Functional outcome
  • Hip fracture
  • Men
  • Mortality
  • Population-based study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Poor, G., Atkinson, E. J., Lewallen, D. G., O'Fallon, W. M., & Melton, L. J. (1995). Age-related hip fractures in men: Clinical spectrum and short-term outcomes. Osteoporosis International, 5(6), 419-426. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01626602

Age-related hip fractures in men : Clinical spectrum and short-term outcomes. / Poor, G.; Atkinson, E. J.; Lewallen, D. G.; O'Fallon, W. M.; Melton, L. J.

In: Osteoporosis International, Vol. 5, No. 6, 11.1995, p. 419-426.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Poor, G, Atkinson, EJ, Lewallen, DG, O'Fallon, WM & Melton, LJ 1995, 'Age-related hip fractures in men: Clinical spectrum and short-term outcomes', Osteoporosis International, vol. 5, no. 6, pp. 419-426. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01626602
Poor, G. ; Atkinson, E. J. ; Lewallen, D. G. ; O'Fallon, W. M. ; Melton, L. J. / Age-related hip fractures in men : Clinical spectrum and short-term outcomes. In: Osteoporosis International. 1995 ; Vol. 5, No. 6. pp. 419-426.
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