African American women's perceptions and attitudes regarding participation in medical research: The mayo clinic/the links, incorporated partnership

LaPrincess Brewer, Sharonne N. Hayes, Monica W. Parker, Joyce Balls-Berry, Michele Y. Halyard, Vivian W. Pinn, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine perceptions and attitudes toward health-related research participation among professional African American women. Methods: Participants were members of an African American women's service organization, The Links, Incorporated. Data were collected via self-administered questionnaires at The Links, Incorporated 2012 National Assembly. Sociodemographics, prior research experience, intention to participate (ITP), willingness to participate (WTP) in a variety of research studies and attitudes about research participation were measured. Results: A total of 381 surveys were analyzed. A majority of respondents were married (66%), employed (69%), and college educated (96%). Median age was 59; 38% reported prior research participation. Overall, 78% agreed with the statement, "Participation in research will mean better care," 24% agreed "Participation in research is risky" and 3% agreed "Scientists cannot be trusted." Fifty-two percent agreed with the statement, "Research conducted in the U.S. is ethical." Mean ITP in research was 4.9±1.7 on a rating scale of 1 ("definitely no") to 7 ("definitely yes"). WTP was highest for an interview study and providing a blood sample, and lowest for clinical trial and medical record review. Conclusion: Attitudes toward research participation were generally favorable among professional African American women; many expressed WTP in a variety of research study types.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)681-687
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume23
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2014

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African Americans
Biomedical Research
Research
Attitude to Health
Medical Records
Clinical Trials
Organizations
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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African American women's perceptions and attitudes regarding participation in medical research : The mayo clinic/the links, incorporated partnership. / Brewer, LaPrincess; Hayes, Sharonne N.; Parker, Monica W.; Balls-Berry, Joyce; Halyard, Michele Y.; Pinn, Vivian W.; Radecki Breitkopf, Carmen.

In: Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 23, No. 8, 01.08.2014, p. 681-687.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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