African American primary care physicians' perceptions and practices regarding smoking cessation therapy

Joyce Balls-Berry, James H. Price, Joseph A. Dake, Timothy R. Jordan, Sadik Khuder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

African American smokers (34% of males and 23% of females) need formal interventions to assist them in quitting smoking, a major method of preventing premature mortality from smoking-related illnesses. The purpose of this study was to examine African American primary care physicians' perceptions and practices regarding smoking cessation counseling. A national random sample (n = 202) of primary care physicians was asked about their perceptions and practices regarding smoking cessation therapy. Most (89%) placed themselves in the maintenance stage for asking their patients about their smoking status and regularly documented the smoking status of their patients (70%). Most physicians did not comply with all of the components of the US Public Health Services' smoking cessation guidelines (eg, 5 A's and 5 R's). The component most often implemented of the 5 A's was to "advise" patients to quit (89%), and "arrange" follow-up was the least frequently (60%) used component. Perceived barriers to engaging in smoking cessation interventions were time (38%) and patients not interested in quitting (19%). Although physicians used many of the steps in the 5 A's and 5 R's, they were far less compliant in recommending nicotine replacement therapy, prescribing pharmacotherapy, and providing support and/or follow-up for patients who were willing to quit smoking. Physicians need more academic preparation in providing smoking cessation counseling since few received such training in medical school (31%) or during their residency programs (18%).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)579-589
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume102
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Primary Care Physicians
Smoking Cessation
African Americans
Smoking
Physicians
Counseling
Therapeutics
Premature Mortality
United States Public Health Service
Internship and Residency
Medical Schools
Nicotine
Maintenance
Guidelines
Drug Therapy

Keywords

  • Primary care
  • Tobacco

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

African American primary care physicians' perceptions and practices regarding smoking cessation therapy. / Balls-Berry, Joyce; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph A.; Jordan, Timothy R.; Khuder, Sadik.

In: Journal of the National Medical Association, Vol. 102, No. 7, 01.01.2010, p. 579-589.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Balls-Berry, Joyce ; Price, James H. ; Dake, Joseph A. ; Jordan, Timothy R. ; Khuder, Sadik. / African American primary care physicians' perceptions and practices regarding smoking cessation therapy. In: Journal of the National Medical Association. 2010 ; Vol. 102, No. 7. pp. 579-589.
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