Adolescent and Parent Willingness to Participate in Microbicide Safety Studies

Marina Catallozzi, Ariel M. de Roche, Mei Chen Hu, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Jane Chang, Lisa S. Ipp, Jenny K R Francis, Susan L. Rosenthal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objective To understand adolescents’ and parents’ willingness to participate (WTP) in a hypothetical phase I prevention study of sexually transmitted infections, discordance within adolescent-parent dyads, and expectations of each other during decision-making. Design and Setting Adolescent-parent dyads were recruited to participate in a longitudinal study about research participation attitudes. Participants Adolescents (14-17 years old) and their parents (n = 301 dyads) participated. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measures Individual interviews at baseline assessed WTP on a 6-level Likert scale. WTP was dichotomized (willing/unwilling) to assess discordance. Results WTP was reported by 60% (182 of 301) of adolescents and 52% (156 of 300) of parents. In bivariate analyses, older adolescent age, sexual experience, and less involvement of parents in research processes were associated with higher level of WTP for adolescents; only sexual experience remained in the multivariable analysis. For parents, older adolescent age, perceived adolescent sexual experience, and conversations about sexual health were significant; only conversations remained. Dyadic discordance (44%, 132 of 300) was more likely in dyads in which the parent reported previous research experience, and less likely when parents reported higher family expressiveness. Adolescents (83%, 248 of 299) and parents (88%, 263 of 300) thought that the other would have similar views, influence their decision (adolescents 66%, 199 of 300; parents 75%, 224 of 300), and listen (adolescents 90%, 270 of 300; parents 96%, 287 of 300). There were no relationships between these perceptions and discordance. Conclusion Inclusion of adolescents in phase I clinical trials is necessary to ensure that new methods are safe, effective, and acceptable for them. Because these trials currently require parental consent, strategies that manage adolescent-parent discordance and support adolescent independence and parental guidance are critically needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)82-87
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Fingerprint

Anti-Infective Agents
Safety
Parents
Research
Parental Consent
Clinical Trials, Phase I
Reproductive Health
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Longitudinal Studies
Decision Making

Keywords

  • Adolescent research participation
  • Clinical trials
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Topical microbicides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Adolescent and Parent Willingness to Participate in Microbicide Safety Studies. / Catallozzi, Marina; de Roche, Ariel M.; Hu, Mei Chen; Radecki Breitkopf, Carmen; Chang, Jane; Ipp, Lisa S.; Francis, Jenny K R; Rosenthal, Susan L.

In: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.02.2017, p. 82-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Catallozzi, Marina ; de Roche, Ariel M. ; Hu, Mei Chen ; Radecki Breitkopf, Carmen ; Chang, Jane ; Ipp, Lisa S. ; Francis, Jenny K R ; Rosenthal, Susan L. / Adolescent and Parent Willingness to Participate in Microbicide Safety Studies. In: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. 2017 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 82-87.
@article{aaa03d1467db495eaea40614c30f6d46,
title = "Adolescent and Parent Willingness to Participate in Microbicide Safety Studies",
abstract = "Study Objective To understand adolescents’ and parents’ willingness to participate (WTP) in a hypothetical phase I prevention study of sexually transmitted infections, discordance within adolescent-parent dyads, and expectations of each other during decision-making. Design and Setting Adolescent-parent dyads were recruited to participate in a longitudinal study about research participation attitudes. Participants Adolescents (14-17 years old) and their parents (n = 301 dyads) participated. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measures Individual interviews at baseline assessed WTP on a 6-level Likert scale. WTP was dichotomized (willing/unwilling) to assess discordance. Results WTP was reported by 60{\%} (182 of 301) of adolescents and 52{\%} (156 of 300) of parents. In bivariate analyses, older adolescent age, sexual experience, and less involvement of parents in research processes were associated with higher level of WTP for adolescents; only sexual experience remained in the multivariable analysis. For parents, older adolescent age, perceived adolescent sexual experience, and conversations about sexual health were significant; only conversations remained. Dyadic discordance (44{\%}, 132 of 300) was more likely in dyads in which the parent reported previous research experience, and less likely when parents reported higher family expressiveness. Adolescents (83{\%}, 248 of 299) and parents (88{\%}, 263 of 300) thought that the other would have similar views, influence their decision (adolescents 66{\%}, 199 of 300; parents 75{\%}, 224 of 300), and listen (adolescents 90{\%}, 270 of 300; parents 96{\%}, 287 of 300). There were no relationships between these perceptions and discordance. Conclusion Inclusion of adolescents in phase I clinical trials is necessary to ensure that new methods are safe, effective, and acceptable for them. Because these trials currently require parental consent, strategies that manage adolescent-parent discordance and support adolescent independence and parental guidance are critically needed.",
keywords = "Adolescent research participation, Clinical trials, Sexually transmitted infections, Topical microbicides",
author = "Marina Catallozzi and {de Roche}, {Ariel M.} and Hu, {Mei Chen} and {Radecki Breitkopf}, Carmen and Jane Chang and Ipp, {Lisa S.} and Francis, {Jenny K R} and Rosenthal, {Susan L.}",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpag.2016.06.009",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "82--87",
journal = "Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology",
issn = "1083-3188",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adolescent and Parent Willingness to Participate in Microbicide Safety Studies

AU - Catallozzi, Marina

AU - de Roche, Ariel M.

AU - Hu, Mei Chen

AU - Radecki Breitkopf, Carmen

AU - Chang, Jane

AU - Ipp, Lisa S.

AU - Francis, Jenny K R

AU - Rosenthal, Susan L.

PY - 2017/2/1

Y1 - 2017/2/1

N2 - Study Objective To understand adolescents’ and parents’ willingness to participate (WTP) in a hypothetical phase I prevention study of sexually transmitted infections, discordance within adolescent-parent dyads, and expectations of each other during decision-making. Design and Setting Adolescent-parent dyads were recruited to participate in a longitudinal study about research participation attitudes. Participants Adolescents (14-17 years old) and their parents (n = 301 dyads) participated. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measures Individual interviews at baseline assessed WTP on a 6-level Likert scale. WTP was dichotomized (willing/unwilling) to assess discordance. Results WTP was reported by 60% (182 of 301) of adolescents and 52% (156 of 300) of parents. In bivariate analyses, older adolescent age, sexual experience, and less involvement of parents in research processes were associated with higher level of WTP for adolescents; only sexual experience remained in the multivariable analysis. For parents, older adolescent age, perceived adolescent sexual experience, and conversations about sexual health were significant; only conversations remained. Dyadic discordance (44%, 132 of 300) was more likely in dyads in which the parent reported previous research experience, and less likely when parents reported higher family expressiveness. Adolescents (83%, 248 of 299) and parents (88%, 263 of 300) thought that the other would have similar views, influence their decision (adolescents 66%, 199 of 300; parents 75%, 224 of 300), and listen (adolescents 90%, 270 of 300; parents 96%, 287 of 300). There were no relationships between these perceptions and discordance. Conclusion Inclusion of adolescents in phase I clinical trials is necessary to ensure that new methods are safe, effective, and acceptable for them. Because these trials currently require parental consent, strategies that manage adolescent-parent discordance and support adolescent independence and parental guidance are critically needed.

AB - Study Objective To understand adolescents’ and parents’ willingness to participate (WTP) in a hypothetical phase I prevention study of sexually transmitted infections, discordance within adolescent-parent dyads, and expectations of each other during decision-making. Design and Setting Adolescent-parent dyads were recruited to participate in a longitudinal study about research participation attitudes. Participants Adolescents (14-17 years old) and their parents (n = 301 dyads) participated. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measures Individual interviews at baseline assessed WTP on a 6-level Likert scale. WTP was dichotomized (willing/unwilling) to assess discordance. Results WTP was reported by 60% (182 of 301) of adolescents and 52% (156 of 300) of parents. In bivariate analyses, older adolescent age, sexual experience, and less involvement of parents in research processes were associated with higher level of WTP for adolescents; only sexual experience remained in the multivariable analysis. For parents, older adolescent age, perceived adolescent sexual experience, and conversations about sexual health were significant; only conversations remained. Dyadic discordance (44%, 132 of 300) was more likely in dyads in which the parent reported previous research experience, and less likely when parents reported higher family expressiveness. Adolescents (83%, 248 of 299) and parents (88%, 263 of 300) thought that the other would have similar views, influence their decision (adolescents 66%, 199 of 300; parents 75%, 224 of 300), and listen (adolescents 90%, 270 of 300; parents 96%, 287 of 300). There were no relationships between these perceptions and discordance. Conclusion Inclusion of adolescents in phase I clinical trials is necessary to ensure that new methods are safe, effective, and acceptable for them. Because these trials currently require parental consent, strategies that manage adolescent-parent discordance and support adolescent independence and parental guidance are critically needed.

KW - Adolescent research participation

KW - Clinical trials

KW - Sexually transmitted infections

KW - Topical microbicides

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84992390653&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84992390653&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpag.2016.06.009

DO - 10.1016/j.jpag.2016.06.009

M3 - Article

C2 - 27381236

AN - SCOPUS:84992390653

VL - 30

SP - 82

EP - 87

JO - Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology

JF - Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology

SN - 1083-3188

IS - 1

ER -