Adjacent segment disease after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: Clinical outcomes after first repeat surgery versus second repeat surgery

Risheng Xu, Mohamad Bydon, Mohamed Macki, Rafael De La Garza-Ramos, Daniel M. Sciubba, Jean Paul Wolinsky, Timothy F. Witham, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Ali Bydon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Design. Retrospective clinical study. Objective. To study the long-term effects of repeat cervical fusion after development of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Summary of Background Data. ASD is a well-recognized development after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Although there are data on the development of ASD after ACDF, the incidence of ASD after repeat ACDF has not been well established. Methods. We collected 888 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF for cervical degenerative disease during a 20-year period at a single institution. Patients were followed for an average of 94.0 ± 78.1 months after the first ACDF. Results. Of the 888 patients who underwent ACDF, 108 patients developed ASD, necessitating a second cervical fusion. Among these 108 patients, 27 patients later developed recurrent ASD, requiring a third cervical fusion. Thus, in this series, the incidence of ASD after ACDF is 12.2%, statistically increasing to 25% after a second cervical fusion (P = 0.0002). Notably, ASD occurred 47.0 ± 44.9 months after the first ACDF and statistically decreased to 30.3 ± 24.9 months after a second cervical fusion (P = 0.01). Of the 77 patients who underwent a second cervical fusion via an anterior approach, 23 developed recurrent ASD requiring a third cervical fusion. In contrast, of the 31 patients who had a posteriorly approached second cervical fusion, only 4 developed recurrent ASD requiring a third cervical fusion. Conclusion. We present a cohort of patients undergoing multiple sequential operations due to ASD during a 20-year period. In this series of 888 patients, the incidence of ASD development is lowest after the first ACDF. Patients who undergo a second cervical fusion develop ASD at both higher and faster rates. Moreover, patients who had a second cervical fusion via an anterior approach had a higher chance of developing recurrent ASD versus patients who had a posterior approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-126
Number of pages7
JournalSpine
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Adjacent level disease
  • Adjacent segment disease
  • Anterior
  • Anterior cervical
  • Cervical
  • Discectomy
  • Discectomy and fusion
  • Fusion
  • Outcome
  • Repeat
  • Spine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Adjacent segment disease after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion : Clinical outcomes after first repeat surgery versus second repeat surgery. / Xu, Risheng; Bydon, Mohamad; Macki, Mohamed; De La Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Wolinsky, Jean Paul; Witham, Timothy F.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Bydon, Ali.

In: Spine, Vol. 39, No. 2, 15.01.2014, p. 120-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Xu, R, Bydon, M, Macki, M, De La Garza-Ramos, R, Sciubba, DM, Wolinsky, JP, Witham, TF, Gokaslan, ZL & Bydon, A 2014, 'Adjacent segment disease after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: Clinical outcomes after first repeat surgery versus second repeat surgery', Spine, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 120-126. https://doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0000000000000074
Xu, Risheng ; Bydon, Mohamad ; Macki, Mohamed ; De La Garza-Ramos, Rafael ; Sciubba, Daniel M. ; Wolinsky, Jean Paul ; Witham, Timothy F. ; Gokaslan, Ziya L. ; Bydon, Ali. / Adjacent segment disease after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion : Clinical outcomes after first repeat surgery versus second repeat surgery. In: Spine. 2014 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 120-126.
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abstract = "Study Design. Retrospective clinical study. Objective. To study the long-term effects of repeat cervical fusion after development of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Summary of Background Data. ASD is a well-recognized development after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Although there are data on the development of ASD after ACDF, the incidence of ASD after repeat ACDF has not been well established. Methods. We collected 888 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF for cervical degenerative disease during a 20-year period at a single institution. Patients were followed for an average of 94.0 ± 78.1 months after the first ACDF. Results. Of the 888 patients who underwent ACDF, 108 patients developed ASD, necessitating a second cervical fusion. Among these 108 patients, 27 patients later developed recurrent ASD, requiring a third cervical fusion. Thus, in this series, the incidence of ASD after ACDF is 12.2{\%}, statistically increasing to 25{\%} after a second cervical fusion (P = 0.0002). Notably, ASD occurred 47.0 ± 44.9 months after the first ACDF and statistically decreased to 30.3 ± 24.9 months after a second cervical fusion (P = 0.01). Of the 77 patients who underwent a second cervical fusion via an anterior approach, 23 developed recurrent ASD requiring a third cervical fusion. In contrast, of the 31 patients who had a posteriorly approached second cervical fusion, only 4 developed recurrent ASD requiring a third cervical fusion. Conclusion. We present a cohort of patients undergoing multiple sequential operations due to ASD during a 20-year period. In this series of 888 patients, the incidence of ASD development is lowest after the first ACDF. Patients who undergo a second cervical fusion develop ASD at both higher and faster rates. Moreover, patients who had a second cervical fusion via an anterior approach had a higher chance of developing recurrent ASD versus patients who had a posterior approach.",
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T2 - Clinical outcomes after first repeat surgery versus second repeat surgery

AU - Xu, Risheng

AU - Bydon, Mohamad

AU - Macki, Mohamed

AU - De La Garza-Ramos, Rafael

AU - Sciubba, Daniel M.

AU - Wolinsky, Jean Paul

AU - Witham, Timothy F.

AU - Gokaslan, Ziya L.

AU - Bydon, Ali

PY - 2014/1/15

Y1 - 2014/1/15

N2 - Study Design. Retrospective clinical study. Objective. To study the long-term effects of repeat cervical fusion after development of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Summary of Background Data. ASD is a well-recognized development after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Although there are data on the development of ASD after ACDF, the incidence of ASD after repeat ACDF has not been well established. Methods. We collected 888 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF for cervical degenerative disease during a 20-year period at a single institution. Patients were followed for an average of 94.0 ± 78.1 months after the first ACDF. Results. Of the 888 patients who underwent ACDF, 108 patients developed ASD, necessitating a second cervical fusion. Among these 108 patients, 27 patients later developed recurrent ASD, requiring a third cervical fusion. Thus, in this series, the incidence of ASD after ACDF is 12.2%, statistically increasing to 25% after a second cervical fusion (P = 0.0002). Notably, ASD occurred 47.0 ± 44.9 months after the first ACDF and statistically decreased to 30.3 ± 24.9 months after a second cervical fusion (P = 0.01). Of the 77 patients who underwent a second cervical fusion via an anterior approach, 23 developed recurrent ASD requiring a third cervical fusion. In contrast, of the 31 patients who had a posteriorly approached second cervical fusion, only 4 developed recurrent ASD requiring a third cervical fusion. Conclusion. We present a cohort of patients undergoing multiple sequential operations due to ASD during a 20-year period. In this series of 888 patients, the incidence of ASD development is lowest after the first ACDF. Patients who undergo a second cervical fusion develop ASD at both higher and faster rates. Moreover, patients who had a second cervical fusion via an anterior approach had a higher chance of developing recurrent ASD versus patients who had a posterior approach.

AB - Study Design. Retrospective clinical study. Objective. To study the long-term effects of repeat cervical fusion after development of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Summary of Background Data. ASD is a well-recognized development after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Although there are data on the development of ASD after ACDF, the incidence of ASD after repeat ACDF has not been well established. Methods. We collected 888 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF for cervical degenerative disease during a 20-year period at a single institution. Patients were followed for an average of 94.0 ± 78.1 months after the first ACDF. Results. Of the 888 patients who underwent ACDF, 108 patients developed ASD, necessitating a second cervical fusion. Among these 108 patients, 27 patients later developed recurrent ASD, requiring a third cervical fusion. Thus, in this series, the incidence of ASD after ACDF is 12.2%, statistically increasing to 25% after a second cervical fusion (P = 0.0002). Notably, ASD occurred 47.0 ± 44.9 months after the first ACDF and statistically decreased to 30.3 ± 24.9 months after a second cervical fusion (P = 0.01). Of the 77 patients who underwent a second cervical fusion via an anterior approach, 23 developed recurrent ASD requiring a third cervical fusion. In contrast, of the 31 patients who had a posteriorly approached second cervical fusion, only 4 developed recurrent ASD requiring a third cervical fusion. Conclusion. We present a cohort of patients undergoing multiple sequential operations due to ASD during a 20-year period. In this series of 888 patients, the incidence of ASD development is lowest after the first ACDF. Patients who undergo a second cervical fusion develop ASD at both higher and faster rates. Moreover, patients who had a second cervical fusion via an anterior approach had a higher chance of developing recurrent ASD versus patients who had a posterior approach.

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KW - Anterior cervical

KW - Cervical

KW - Discectomy

KW - Discectomy and fusion

KW - Fusion

KW - Outcome

KW - Repeat

KW - Spine

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