Adiposity, Change in Adiposity, and Cognitive Decline in Mid- and Late Life

Nancy A. West, Seth T. Lirette, Victoria A. Cannon, Stephen T Turner, Thomas H. Mosley, Beverly G. Windham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To examine associations between adiposity and adiposity change (loss, stable, gain) and subsequent longitudinal cognitive performance in African Americans in mid and late life. Design: Cohort study using linear mixed models. Setting: Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy. Participants: African-American sibships with hypertension in Jackson, Mississippi (N = 1,108). Measurements: Waist circumference and body mass index (BMI) were measured at two examinations 5 years apart. Stable adiposity was defined as values within 5% of the first measure. A composite cognitive Z-score was derived from individual cognitive test Z-scores at two study visits 6 years apart. Results: Larger waist circumference was associated with greater rate of cognitive decline during follow-up (beta = -0.0009 per year, P = .001); BMI, change in waist circumference, and change in BMI were not associated with rate of decline. Loss of adiposity in midlife was associated with higher cognitive Z-scores in middle-aged individuals, and loss of adiposity in late life was associated with lower Z-scores in older adults (P = .01 for interaction between waist circumference and age; P = .04 for interaction between BMI and age). Simultaneous inclusion of waist circumference and BMI in the cross-sectional model suggested an association between larger waist circumference and poorer cognitive performance (beta = -0.009, P = .006) and between higher BMI and better cognitive performance (beta = 0.014, P = .06). Conclusion: The results suggested a differential pattern of the relationship between adiposity and cognition according to age (mid- or late life) and regional distribution of adiposity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Adiposity
Waist Circumference
Body Mass Index
African Americans
Mississippi
Molecular Epidemiology
Cognitive Dysfunction
Cognition
Linear Models
Cohort Studies
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Cognitive decline
  • Ethnicity
  • Longitudinal
  • Waist circumference

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Adiposity, Change in Adiposity, and Cognitive Decline in Mid- and Late Life. / West, Nancy A.; Lirette, Seth T.; Cannon, Victoria A.; Turner, Stephen T; Mosley, Thomas H.; Windham, Beverly G.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

West, Nancy A. ; Lirette, Seth T. ; Cannon, Victoria A. ; Turner, Stephen T ; Mosley, Thomas H. ; Windham, Beverly G. / Adiposity, Change in Adiposity, and Cognitive Decline in Mid- and Late Life. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2017.
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