Adapting antibodies for clinical use

Robert E. Hawkins, Meirion B. Llewelyn, Stephen J Russell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Techniques for antibody engineering are now over-coming the problems that have prevented monoclonal antibodies being used routinely in clinical practice. With chemical and genetic manipulation antibodies can be linked to bacterial toxins, enzymes, radionuclides, or cytotoxic drugs, allowing targeting of treatment. Antigen binding sites from antibodies raised in mice can be joined with human IgG to reduce immunogenicity. In vitro gene amplification and genetic engineering of bacteriophage have produced large antibody gene libraries and facilitated large scale production of human monoclonal antibodies with high specificity. The trickle of monoclonal antibodies into clinical practice may soon become a flood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1348-1351
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Medical Journal
Volume305
Issue number6865
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Monoclonal Antibodies
Antibodies
Antibody Binding Sites
Bacterial Toxins
Genetic Engineering
Gene Amplification
Drug Delivery Systems
Gene Library
Radioisotopes
Bacteriophages
Immunoglobulin G
Antigens
Enzymes
Therapeutics
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Hawkins, R. E., Llewelyn, M. B., & Russell, S. J. (1992). Adapting antibodies for clinical use. British Medical Journal, 305(6865), 1348-1351.

Adapting antibodies for clinical use. / Hawkins, Robert E.; Llewelyn, Meirion B.; Russell, Stephen J.

In: British Medical Journal, Vol. 305, No. 6865, 1992, p. 1348-1351.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hawkins, RE, Llewelyn, MB & Russell, SJ 1992, 'Adapting antibodies for clinical use', British Medical Journal, vol. 305, no. 6865, pp. 1348-1351.
Hawkins RE, Llewelyn MB, Russell SJ. Adapting antibodies for clinical use. British Medical Journal. 1992;305(6865):1348-1351.
Hawkins, Robert E. ; Llewelyn, Meirion B. ; Russell, Stephen J. / Adapting antibodies for clinical use. In: British Medical Journal. 1992 ; Vol. 305, No. 6865. pp. 1348-1351.
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