Acute testosterone deficiency alters adipose tissue fatty acid storage

Sylvia Santosa, Nikki C. Bush, Michael Dennis Jensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Although the long-term effects of testosterone on adipose tissue lipid metabolism in men have been defined, the short-term regulation of these effects is not well understood. Objective: We examined the effects of acute testosterone withdrawal on subcutaneous abdominal and femoral adipose tissue fatty acid (FA) storage and cellular mechanisms. Design: This was a prospective, randomized trial. Setting: Mayo Clinic Clinical Research Unit. Patients or Participants: Thirty-two male volunteers ages 18 to 50 participated in these studies. Interventions: Volunteers were randomized to receive (1) no treatment (control), (2) injections (7.5 mg) of Lupron®, or (3) Lupron and testosterone (L+T) replacement for 49 days, resulting in 4 weeks of sex steroid suppression in the Lupron group. Main Outcome Measures: We measured body composition, fat cell size, adipose tissue meal FA and direct free FA storage, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), acyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACS), diacylglycerol acyltransferase activities, and CD36 content. Results: Compared with control and L+T groups, acute testosterone deficiency resulted in greater femoral adipose tissue meal FA storage rates, fasting and fed LPL activity, and ACS activity. Conclusions: These results suggest that in men, testosterone plays a tonic role in restraining FA storage in femoral adipose tissue via suppression of LPL and ACS activities. FA storage mechanisms in men appear sensitive to short-term changes in testosterone concentrations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3056-3064
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume102
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

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Testosterone
Adipose Tissue
Fatty Acids
Coenzyme A Ligases
Tissue
Leuprolide
Lipoprotein Lipase
Thigh
Meals
Volunteers
Diacylglycerol O-Acyltransferase
Abdominal Subcutaneous Fat
Body Composition
Cell Size
Lipid Metabolism
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Adipocytes
Fasting
Fats
Steroids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

Acute testosterone deficiency alters adipose tissue fatty acid storage. / Santosa, Sylvia; Bush, Nikki C.; Jensen, Michael Dennis.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 102, No. 8, 01.08.2017, p. 3056-3064.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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