Acute Kidney Injury: Tubular Markers and Risk for Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Kidney Failure

Hon Liang Tan, John Q. Yap, Qi Qian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common clinical syndrome directly related to patient short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. Over the last decade, the occurrence rate of AKI has been increasing, and there has also been a growing epidemic of chronic kidney diseases (CKD) and end-stage kidney disease (ESRD) linked to severe and repeated episodes of AKIs. The detection and management of AKI are currently far from satisfactory. A large proportion of AKI patients, especially those with preexisting CKD, are at an increased risk of non-resolving AKI and progressing to CKD and ESRD. Proposed pathological processes that contribute to the transition of AKI to CKD and ESRD include severity and frequency of kidney injury, alterations of tubular cell phenotype with cells predominantly in the G2/M phase, interstitial fibrosis and microvascular rarification related to loss of endothelial-pericyte interactions and pericyte dedifferentiation. Innate immune responses, especially dendritic cell responses related to inadequate adenosine receptor (2a)-mediated signals, autophagic insufficiency and renin-angiotensin system activation have also been implicated in the progression of AKI and transitions from AKI to CKD and ESRD. Although promising advances have been made in understanding the pathophysiology of AKI and AKI consequences, much more work needs to be done in developing biomarkers for detecting early kidney injury, prognosticating kidney disease progression and developing strategies to effectively treat AKI and to minimize AKI progression to CKD and ESRD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)144-150
Number of pages7
JournalBlood Purification
Volume41
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Acute Kidney Injury
Renal Insufficiency
Chronic Kidney Failure
Pericytes
Kidney
Purinergic P1 Receptors
G2 Phase
Wounds and Injuries
Kidney Diseases
Pathologic Processes
Renin-Angiotensin System
Innate Immunity
Cell Division
Dendritic Cells
Disease Progression
Fibrosis
Biomarkers
Morbidity
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Acute kidney injury
  • Biomarkers
  • Chronic kidney diseases
  • Differential diagnosis
  • End-stage renal failure
  • Prognosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Nephrology

Cite this

Acute Kidney Injury : Tubular Markers and Risk for Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Kidney Failure. / Tan, Hon Liang; Yap, John Q.; Qian, Qi.

In: Blood Purification, Vol. 41, No. 1-3, 01.03.2016, p. 144-150.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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